Foods of the Foreign-born


FOODS OF

THE FOREIGN-BORN


In Relation to Health

 

By BERTHA M. WOOD

Dietitian, Food Clinic, Boston Dispensary

With a Foreword by MICHAEL M. DAVIS, Jr.

 

Wood - Foods of the Foreign-Born.jpg

 

WHITCOMB & BARROWS
BOSTON, 1922



Copyright, 1922
By Whitcomb & Barrows

 

MADE IN U. S. A.



PREFACE


The purpose of the study which resulted in the collection of the enclosed material was to compare the foods of other peoples with that of the Americans in relation to health. The inspiration for the work came at the request of Mr. Michael M. Davis, Jr.

A deep sense of appreciation is felt toward many friends and fellow workers who very kindly cooperated. Acknowledgment is here given to a large number of men and women of different nationalities for their patience and help in teaching the recipes which had to be made many times before the measurements were standardized.

Mrs. Mary L. Schapiro's article, "Jewish Dietary Problems," was of great value in making the study of Jewish food habits.

Many thanks are due to Miss Minnie Newman, of the Foreign Department of the National Young Women's Christian Association, for much information secured in relation to both the Polish and Hungarian diets.

To all others who from time to time added valuable information, this piece of work is gratefully dedicated.

Bertha M. Wood.

Boston, December, 1921.



CONTENTS

  1. CHAPTERPAGE
  2. ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    vii
  3. I.
    Dietary Backgrounds
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    1
  4. II.
    Mexicans
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    6
  5. III.
    Portuguese
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    10
  6. IV.
    Italians
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    18
  7. V.
    Hungarians
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    39
  8. VI.
    Poles and Other Slavic Peoples
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    49
  9. VII.
    The Near East: Armenians, Syrians, Turks, and Greeks
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    65
  10. VIII.
    Jews
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    82
  11. IX.
    Applications
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    96

Portions of Chapters I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX, were published in "Immigrant Health and the Community," by Michael M. Davis, Jr., Harper and Brothers, New York, to whom acknowledgment is here made.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1925. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).