Index:Discourses of Epictetus.djvu

Discourses of Epictetus.djvu

Title The Discourses of Epictetus
Author Epictetus
Translator George Long
Year 1877
Publisher G. Bell
Location London
Source djvu
Progress To be proofread
Transclusion Index not transcluded or unreviewed

Pages   (key to Page Status)   

- - - - - - - - - -  i  ii  iii  iv  v  vi  vii  viii  ix  x  xi  xii  xiii  xiv  xv  xvi  xvii  xviii  xix  xx  xxi  xxii  xxiii  xxiv  xxv  xxvi  xxvii  xxviii  xxix  xxx  xxxi  xxxii  xxxiii  xxxiv  xxxv  xxxvi  xxxvii  xxxviii  xxxix  xl  xli  xlii  xliii - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 - - - - - - - - - -
CONTENTS.
BOOK I.
CHAP. PAGE
I. Of the Things which are in our Power, and not in our Power 3
II. How a Man on every occasion can maintain his Proper Character 8
III. How a Man should proceed from the principle of God being the Father of all Men to the rest 12
IV. Of Progress or Improvement 13
V. Against the Academics 17
VI. Of Providence 19
VII. Of the use of Sophistical Arguments and Hypothetical, and the like 23
VIII. That the Faculties are not safe to the Uninstructed 28
IX. How from the Fact that we are akin to God a Man may proceed to the Consequences 30
X. Against those who eagerly seek Preferment at Rome 35
XI. Of Natural Affection 37
XII. Of Contentment 41
XIII. How Everything may be done acceptably to the Gods 45
XIV. That the Deity oversees All Things 40
XV. What Philosophy promises 49
XVI. Of Providence 50
XVII. That the Logical Art is necessary 52
XVIII. That we ought not to be Angry with the Errors (Faults) of others 55
XIX. How we should behave to Tyrants 60
XX. About Reason and how it contemplates itself 63
XXI. Against those who wish to be Admired 66
XXII. Of Praecognitions 66
XXIII. Against Epicurus 69
XXIV. How we should struggle with Circumstances 70
XXV. On the same 73
XXVI. What is the Law of Life 77
XXVII. In how many ways Appearances exist, and what Aids we should provide against them 80
XXVIII. That we ought not to be Angry with Men; and what are the Small and the Great Things among Men 83
XXIX. On Constancy (or Firmness) 87
XXX. What we ought to have ready in Difficult Circumstances 96

BOOK II.
I. That Confidence (Courage) is not inconsistent with Caution 97
II. Of Tranquillity (Freedom from Perturbation) 103
III. To those who recommend Persons to Philosophers 106
IV. Against a Person who had once been detected in Adultery 107
V. How Magnanimity is consistent with Care 108
VI. Of Indifference 112
VII. How we ought to use Divination 116
VIII. What is the Nature (ἡ οὐσία) of the Good 118
IX. That when we cannot fulfil that which the Character of a Man promises, we assume the Character of a Philosopher 123
X. How we may discover the Duties of Life from Names 127
XI. What the Beginning of Philosophy is 130
XII. Of Disputation or Discussion 133
XIII. Of Anxiety (Solicitude) 136
XIV. To Naso 140
XV. To or against those who obstinately Persist in what they have determined 144
XVI. That we do not strive to use our Opinions about Good and Evil 147
XVII. How we must adapt Preconceptions to particular Cases 153
XVIII. How we should struggle against Appearances 158
XIX. Against those who embrace Philosophical Opinions only in Words 162
XX. Against the Epicureans and Academics 167
XXI. Of Inconsistency 173
XXII. Of Friendship 176
XXIII. On the Power of Speaking 182
XXIV. To (or against) a Person who was one of those who were not valued (esteemed) by him 188
XXV. That Logic is necessary 192
XXVI. What is the Property of Error 192

BOOK III.
I. Of Finery in Dress 195
II. In what a Man ought to be exercised who has made Proficiency; and that we neglect the Chief Things 201
III. What is the Matter on which a Good Man should be employed, and in what we ought chiefly to employ ourselves 204
IV. Against a Person who showed his Partizanship in an unseemly way in a Theatre 207
V. Against those who on account of Sickness go away Home 209
VI. Miscellaneous 211
VII. To the Administrator of the Free Cities who was an Epicurean 213
VIII. How we must exercise ourselves against Appearances (φαντασίαι) 218
IX. To a certain Rhetorician who was going up to Rome on a Suit 219
X. In what Manner we ought to bear Sickness 222
XI. Certain Miscellaneous Matters 225
XII. About Exercise 225
XIII. What Solitude is, and what Kind of Person a Solitary Man is 228
XIV. Certain Miscellaneous Matters 233
XV. That we ought to proceed with Circumspection to Everything 231
XVI. That we ought with Caution to enter into Familiar Intercourse with Men 236
XVII. Of Providence 238
XVIII. That we ought not to be disturbed by any News 239
XIX. What is the Condition of a Common Kind of Man and of a Philosopher 210
XX. That we can derive Advantage from all External Things 241
XXI. Against those who readily come to the Profession of Sophists 244
XXII. About Cynism 248
XXIII. To those who read and discuss for the sake of Ostentation 264
XXIV. That we ought not to be moved by a Desire of those Things which are not in our Power 270
XXV. To those who fall off (desist) from their Purpose 287
XXVI. To those who fear Want 289

BOOK IV.
I. About Freedom 295
II. Of Familiar Intimacy 322
III. What Things we should Exchange for other Things 324
IV. To those who are desirous of passing Life in Tranquillity 325
V. Against the Quarrelsome and Ferocious 333
VI. Against those who lament over being Pitied 339
VII. On Freedom from Fear 345
VIII. Against those who hastily rush into the Philosophic Dress 351
IX. To a Person who had been changed to a Character of Shamelessness 357
X. What Things we ought to Despise and what Things we ought to Value 360
XI. About Purity (Cleanliness) 366
XII. On Attention 372
XIII. Against or to those who readily Tell their own Affairs 375

The Encheiridion or Manual 379
Fragments 405
Index 441