Index:Transportation and colonization.djvu

Transportation and colonization.djvu
Title Transportation and colonization
Author John Dunmore Lang
Year 1837
Publisher A. J. Valpy
Location London
Source djvu
Progress Proofread—All pages of the work proper are proofread, but not all are validated
Transclusion Fully transcluded
OCLC 1157916942
CONTENTS.
Chapter I.
PAGE
Sketch of the origin and history of the Transportation system 1
Chapter II.
Statement of some of the advantages of Transportation, as a species of punishment 17
Chapter III.
Transportation to the American colonies before the War of Independence, contrasted with the system pursued in the Australian settlements 35
Chapter IV.
First cause of the comparative failure of the Transportation system in the Australian colonies,—the want of a sufficiently numerous free emigrant population 56
Chapter V.
Second cause of the comparative failure of the Transportation system,—the unlimited importation and consumption of ardent spirits in the Australian colonies 76
Chapter VI.
Third cause of the comparative failure of the Transportation system,—the gradual relaxation of penal discipline 89
Chapter VII.
Fourth cause of the comparative failure of the Transportation system,—the facilities for acquiring wealth and influence enjoyed by emancipated convicts in the Australian colonies 97
Chapter VIII.
Fifth cause of the comparative failure of the Transportation system in the Australian colonies,—the transportation of educated convicts 101
Chapter IX.
Suggestions for ensuring the future efficiency of Transportation as a species of punishment.—Changes in the system to be effected in England 115
CHAPTER X.
The discontinuance of the assignment system expedient and practicable 124
CHAPTER XI.
The practicability of obtaining free labour from the mother country, to the full extent required in New South Wales 135
CHAPTER XII.
The practicability of employing transported convicts at government labour exclusively, without increasing the expense of Transportation to the mother country 156
CHAPTER XIII.
Illustration of the facility with which a large number of convicts could be permanently and profitably employed in forming locations for free emigrant settlers 168
CHAPTER XIV.
A third mode of employing convicts at government labour on the Australian continent 194
CHAPTER XV.
Officers required for carrying into effect the new system of management proposed 203
CHAPTER XVI.
The extent to which emigration to New South Wales is at present practicable under the land-selling system, with remarks on the value of that system to the mother country as well as to the colony 210
Conclusion 224
Postscript 243