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Letitia Elizabeth Landon (L. E. L.) in Fisher's Drawing Room Scrap Book, 1834



Letitia Elizabeth Landon
(L. E. L.)
in
Fisher’s Drawing Room Scrap
Book, 1834

compiled by
Peter J. Bolton




1834-0-Vignette.png



TO

LADY STEPNEY,

&c.&c.&c.



Dear Madam,

Will you accept the Inscription
of this Volume, as a slight mark of affectionate
regard from


Yours truly,

L. E. L.

October 1st, 1833

4



PREFACE.


 

Poetry is youth's language; and the scroll
Whereon is poured the music of its soul,
Is like some long-loved friend, whose image seems
To bring back memory's deepest, dearest dreams.
Methinks such tender yet such mournful page
Suits the last months of the year's pilgrimage.



The present volume is so different from its predecessors, that I shall venture, in a few words, to explain my motive for such alteration. Of all soils, a literary one is the soonest exhausted, and a change of subjects is as much needed as a change of crops. The magnificent ruins in the Indian Views suggested at first so much of melancholy reflection on the instability of human glories, that the poems which sought to illustrate "the fallen temple and the lonely tomb," naturally took a sad and thoughtful cast. But as my knowledge of Oriental history increased, I found it full of rich material for narrative; abounding with incidents of interest and of wild adventure. I therefore determined on accompanying the Plates of Eastern scenery this year with a connected Tale. Hope, love, and sorrow form the staple of the poet's song; and though I have adhered as accurately as possible to character, costume, and scenery, it is on the expression of universal feelings that I place reliance, in any attempt of mine to win the sympathy of my readers. I trust the attempt will be its own apology.

The same motive which caused me to give a continued story, instead of separate sketches, to the Indian Views, has also led me to accompany some of the English landscapes in a different style. I can now only entreat a renewal of the indulgence which has been so often extended to one by whom, at least, it is received with delight, and remembered with gratitude.

L. E. L.