Letter to Arthur Brentano

LAURIER HOUSE,       
OTTAWA.
December 22, 1933.  


Dear Mr. Brentano:

              I have just received the photograph of yourself which you have to kindly sent to me. It is an excellent likeness and I am more than proud to be the possessor of it. I can think of no more appropriate photograph to have in the library than that of one who, perhaps more than any other living person, has helped make libraries, especially those of North America, what they are. Apart from this, I cherish such a pleasant remembrance of your kindly spirit and charming personality that I am indeed delighted to have your photograph to place with a ew others I have of very deeply valued friends. I thank you very warmly for this gift, the pleasure of which has been enhanced through its coming to me at the Christmas Season.

              As I said to you at the time of our conversation together, I was not a little distressed when I learned of the ill-fortune which had overtaken your firm. That, however, will appear in the perspective of history as a part of the inevitable outcome of these years of depression. The fine arts are the first to suffer in times like the present. I am glad that you continue to be the president of the new corporation. Indeed, it would be meaningless without your presence, and I much hope that, among the good things which the New Year has in store for you, may be a part ownership of the business regained at an early date. Meanwhile, I think all the book lovers will continue to rejoice at seeing you, continue at the head of the business and will join with me in extending to you the warmest of greeting at this Christmas Season and the best of wishes for the New Year.

With kindest personal regards,
Believe me,
Yours very sincerely,
Mackenzie King



Arthur Brentano, Esq.,

One West 47th St.,
New York City.
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This work is in the public domain in Canada because it originates from Canada and its term of copyright has expired.

The author died in 1950, so this work is in the public domain in Canada because, according to Canadian copyright law, all private copyrights expire fifty years after the year marking the death of the author. This work also in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was legally published within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the United States Headquarters Agreement) between 1923 and 1977 (inclusive) without a copyright notice.


The author died in 1950, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.