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LLOYD, HANNIBAL EVANS (1771–1847), philologist and translator, born in London in 1771, was son of Henry Humphrey Evans Lloyd [q. v.] His mother was descended from the Garnetts of Yorkshire. Both his parents died in his youth, but he was carefully brought up by some near relations. He subsequently visited the continent, and in the spring of 1800 settled at Hamburg. He suffered severely from the hardships to which Hamburg was exposed during its occupation by the French army, and joined the inhabitants in taking up arms in its defence. He eventually effected his escape, but with the loss of nearly the whole of his property. On his arrival in England in July 1813 he published, at the suggestion of Lord Bathurst, the foreign secretary, an account of his experiences at Hamburg, and about the same time received an appointment in the foreign office, the duties of which had previously been divided among several clerks, but Lloyd's extensive acquaintance with continental languages enabled him to discharge them single-handed. He retained the post till his death. A friend of Klopstock, Lloyd translated under his auspices the greater portion of ‘The Messiah,’ but did not publish his version. His excellent memory and varied acquirements made him a delightful companion. He wrote Italian verse with much elegance, and maintained a correspondence with many eminent travellers and men of science.

Lloyd died at Blackheath on 15 July 1847. By his marriage to Miss Von Schwartzkopff of Hamburg he had a son and several daughters.

Lloyd's original writings are: 1. ‘Hamburgh, or a particular account of the Transactions which took place in that City during the first six months of 1813,’ 8vo, London, 1813. 2. ‘Alexander I, Emperor of Russia, or a Sketch of his Life,’ 8vo, London, 1826. 3. ‘George IV, Memoirs of his Life and Reign,’ 8vo, London, 1830. 4. ‘Descriptive and Historical Illustrations,’ in English and French, accompanying J. Coney's ‘Architectural Beauties of Continental Europe,’ fol., London, 1831 [–34]. 5. ‘Descriptive and Historic Illustrations,’ accompanying ‘Picturesque Views in England and Wales by J. M. W. Turner,’ 2 vols. fol., London, 1832–1838. 6. ‘Theoretisch-praktische Englische Sprachlehre für Deutsche,’ 4th edit. 8vo, Hamburg, 1833, long the standard grammar in several of the German universities. 7. ‘English and German Dialogues: with a collection of idioms,’ 8vo, Hamburg, 1842.

He edited or revised Booth's ‘Battle of Waterloo;’ Rördansz's ‘European Commerce,’ 1818 (another edit. 1819); Rabenhorst's ‘German and English Dictionary,’ 1829; ‘Englisches Lesebuch (Gems of Modern English Literature),’ 8vo, Hamburg, 1832; and B. G. Babington's translation of Hecker's ‘Epidemics of the Middle Ages,’ 1844 (Sydenham Society).

Among his translations may be mentioned: Iffland's ‘Nephews,’ a play, 1799; Saabye's ‘Greenland,’ 1818; Prince Wied-Neuwied's ‘Travels in Brazil,’ 1820; Von Kotzebue's ‘Voyage of Discovery into the South Sea and Beerings Straits’ [anon.], 1821; Von Spix and Von Martins's ‘Travels in Brazil,’ 1824; Timkovsky's ‘Travels of the Russian Mission through Mongolia to China,’ 1827; Von Raumer's ‘England in 1835,’ 3 vols. 1836, in collaboration with Sarah Austin; Wolff and Doering's ‘German Tourist,’ 1837; Von Raumer's ‘Political History of England,’ 2 vols. 1837; Waagen's ‘Works of Art and Artists in England,’ 1838; Count Björnstjerna's ‘British Empire in the East’ [anon.], 1840; Von Raumer's ‘England in 1841,’ 1842; Prince Wied-Neuwied's ‘Travels in the Interior of North America,’ 1843; Björnstjerna's ‘Theogony of the Hindoos’ [anon.], 1844; Dahlmann's ‘History of the English Revolution,’ 1844; Von Orlich's ‘Travels in India,’ 1845; Prince Pueckler-Muskau's ‘Egypt under Mehemet Ali,’ 1845; Tams's ‘Visit to the Portuguese Possessions in SouthWestern Africa,’ 1845; and Von Feuchtersleben's ‘Principles of Medical Psychology,’ 1847, revised by B. G. Babington (Sydenham Society).

Lloyd was a constant contributor to the ‘Literary Gazette’ from its commencement in 1817, chiefly on foreign archæology and the fine arts.

[Gent. Mag. 1847, pt. ii. pp. 324–6.]

G. G.