Matawan Regional Teachers Ass'n v. Matawan-Aberdeen Regional School Dist. Bd. of Educ.

Matawan Regional Teachers Ass'n v. Matawan-Aberdeen Regional School Dist. Bd. of Educ.  (1988) 
by the New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division
Syllabus

Court Documents
Opinion of the Court

Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division

223 N.J. Super. 504; 538 A.2d 1331

MATAWAN REGIONAL TEACHERS ASSOCIATION; BOROUGH OF MATAWAN; IRIS ALBIN ET AL.,[1] PETITIONERS-APPELLANTS,  v.  MATAWAN-ABERDEEN REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD OF EDUCATION, RESPONDENT-RESPONDENT

On appeal from State Board of Education.

No. A-1654-86T8, A-1660-86T8  Argued: December 16, 1987, Argued --- Decided: March 14, 1988, Decided --- Approved for publication March 28, 1988.

Mark J. Blunda argued the cause for appellants Matawan Regional Teachers Association of Matawan and individual petitioners (Oxfeld, Cohen & Blunda, attorneys; Mark J. Blunda and, James J. Cleary, of counsel and on the brief).

James J. Cleary argued the cause for appellant Borough of Matawan.

Vincent C. DeMaio argued the cause for respondent (DeMaio & DeMaio, attorneys; Vincent C. DeMaio, of counsel and on the brief).

W. Cary Edwards, Attorney General, attorney for State Board of Education (Nancy Kaplen Miller, Deputy Attorney General, on the statement in lieu of brief).

Furman, Brody and Scalera. The opinion of the court was delivered by Brody, J.A.D.

FootnotesEdit

  1. There are 91 other individual petitioners who are residents and taxpayers of either Matawan or Aberdeen.
 

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