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INDEX


Afghanistan not all mountains, 51
Africa, Central, colonisation of, by whites impossible, 38-41
Agassiz, early training of, 305
Ainos, 49
Albert, Archbishop, on the human heart, 208
Alcibiades charged with impiety, 262
Alexander's successors, effects of wars by, 90
Algeria, 44, 63, note ; influence of, upon French society, 124
Almaden, mines of, 107
Amazon, Indians of, 52 ; whites of, 53
America, Central and Southern, not fitted for white men, 53
America, Southern, clergy control schools, 214
America, tropical, proportions of races in, Appendix A
America, U.S., white population in, 64 ; emigration to, 96 ; European heroism more than matched in, 218-220; experience of, about divorce, 245 ; displacement of office-bearers in, 279 ; not quite unreasonable, 280
American militia not very successful in War of Independence, and beaten in 1812, 115, 116
Anaxagoras charged with impiety, 262
Angola, 35
Anselm revives philosophy, 90 ; compassionate to animals, 218
Apaches untameable, 34
Araucanians uutameable, 34
Argentine Republic, its circumstances exceptional, 58
Arminius, 89
Arnold, Matthew, failed as a lecturer, 164 ; jests on the Trinity, 201 ; responsible for a story about French schools, 223, 224 ; overpraises small men, 309
Asia, Central, capabilities of, 43, 44
Athens an instance of highly-developed city life, 148 ; under the best conditions, 156 ; in the Peloponnesian war, 181, 182 ; energy of its people, 263
Atrato, mouths of, pestilential, 57
Attila, 90
Australia the best inheritance of the higher races, 16 ; an instructive instance of new tendencies, 17, 18 ; peculiarly fitted for settlement, 42 ; emigration to, 96 ; urban population in, 142, 143 ; well-being of its people, 163 ; splendid chances in, 169 ; high schools in, 310
Australia, South, and progressive land-tax, 19
Austria gained by Solferino, 141
Austrian Parliament and Darwin, 267
Aztecs, 56 ; docile, 59

Bacon, Roger, 13 ; pathetic fate of, 212
Balzac paints the French peasant, 169 ; and filial ingratitude, 297
Bankruptcy, national, examples of, 177, 178 ; consequences of, 178
Barrios, a half-caste, 56
Baylen, capitulation of, its character, 120
Beaconsfield, Lord, on critics, 307
Belgium, education in, 214
Bell, Graham, invents telephone, 102, note 1
Bell, Patrick, invents reaping-machine, 102, note 1
Beluchistan not all desert, 51, and note
Bert, Paul, revives Pascal's charges, 216
Bichat essentially a thinker, 151
Birkenhead, heroism of men of the, 139
Black Belt, States of the, 60, 62
Blucher's soldiers comparatively barbarous, 140
Boers, 36 ; occupy Natal, 36 ; defeat English at Majuba Hill, 114, 121, 122
Bolivia, Indians of, 52 ; a tropical Switzerland, 58
Booth's analysis of London population, 154
Borde on Englishmen, 99, note
Borneo, Chinese in, 47
Boudeuse, La, captain of, kills prisoners, 139, note
Bourrienne clothes French troops in England, 184, note
Boyle's estimate of Indian population, 54
Bradlaugh edits jest on the Trinity, 201
Brazil unfitted for Europeans, 53 ; largely negro, 59, 60
British North Borneo Company is stimulating immigration, 49
British rule, its tendencies in India, 51
Browne, Sir T. , uncritical, 305
Browning, on the stage, 165 ; reflective, 167 ; only honoured when old, 331
Brunswick, Duke of, his invasion of France, 116-118
Bryce on laws restraining immigration, 15, note 2 ; on town population in America, 143, note 2 ; on the population of Mexico, 346, note
Buckle's success, 309
Buff on, fascinating style of, 312
Bukhara, 43, note
Bunyan, John, 274
Burke, predictions by, 2, 3 ; describes ravage of the Carnatic, 82 ; a worthy expression of English genius, 151
Burleigh's (Lord) view of marriage, 241, note 1
Bury as historian, 313
Bushmen worthless as slaves, 35 ; exterminated, 36.

Cade, sympathisers with, behead a bishop, 208
Caesar's (Julius) massacres in Gaul, 81 : he saves Rome from the patricians, 326
Caesar, Augustus, 326
Calderon gives the primitive view of marriage, 234
California, chances in, 169
Calvin's rigorous discipline, 195
Cambodia, fine ruins in, 91, 92
Canada, consequences of its conquest, 5 ; mentioned, 44
Canning, prediction by, 3 ; knew English literature, 311
Canterbury, Archbishop of, opposes un-denominational education, 215
Cape Colony, 35, 36
Carera, an Indian, 56
Carlyle approves Frederick II. 's political economy, 107 ; restricts his social intercourse, 157 ; only moderately successful as lecturer, 164
Carnatic ravaged, 82
Carnot organises the French army, 118
Cashmere not adapted for colonisation, 35
Castilla, 56
Catholicism parodied, 24
Cato the Younger lends his wife, 229, note 2
Cato the Censor blamed by Plutarch, 239, note 1
Cavaliers not disinterested, 191
Charles II. a rare exception, 190
Chateaubriand, 151
Chatham as orator, 313, 314 ; gave England an Empire, 326, 327
Chatham, Lord, an incapable general, 280
Chesterfield, Lord, predicts French Revolution, 5 ; his opinion of Chatham as orator, 313, 314, and note
Child on the Act of Uniformity, 193, note
China has little to dread from civilised nations, 34 ; her facilities for colonising Turkestan, 43, 44 ; certain to grow, 45-51 ; could support a larger population, 64-67 ; form its development will take, 95, 96 ; forced into civilisation, 111, 112
Chinamen, 31, 33 ; mortality of, in Nicaragua, 57 ; numbers of, in Siam, 66 ; have supplanted a higher race in Cambodia, 92 ; probable influence of their example upon Europeans, 123-126 ; supplant white labour, 125 ; have added nothing to thought, 341
Choiseul predicts loss of America to England, 5
Cholera, its effects in 1831-32, 153
Christianity copied Paganism, 24
Church has been very useful in the past, 192-194 ; its authority became intolerable, 194-196; inefficient against blasphemy and immorality, 196-198 ; could only succeed at the cost of liberty, 199-201 ; was less capable than the State is of enforcing purity, 201-203 ; was less capable of tolerance than the State is, 203-205 ; was inefficient in its dealing with pauperism, 205-209 ; and with slavery, 209-211 ; and has everywhere opposed a thorough system of national education, 211-216 ; has lost its hold on popular imagination, 216, 217 ; has a lower humanity than the State, 217-220 ; has evaded the recognition of divorce, 235 ; discourages critical examination, 264 ; distrusts the growing power of the State, 266
Cicero loathes life out of Rome, 148
Cid, story of, consistent with the times, 233
Clive a typical Englishman, 100 ; of a type disappearing, 263
Cobden the real author of Free Trade, 331
Cochin China, fine ruins in, 91
Coghill, Dr. M., approved corporal correction for a wife, 251
Coleridge, moderately successful as lecturer, 164 ; on Shakespeare, 307 ; as journalist, 318
Colley, Sir G., character of his defeat, 121, 122
Commin of Deuwick invents reaping-machine, 102, note 1
Comoy, John, demises his wife, 230, note 2
Congo, anticipations about the region of the, 31
Corneille modernises the story of the Cid, 233 ; his Medea quoted, 337
Cortez, 33, 34
Courier, 151 ; transformed by jealousy, 297 ; a transcendent journalist, 319, 320 ; on literary reputation, 332
Cousin on the source of inspiration in writers, 320
Cowley overrated by Johnson, 308
Criticism invaluable and fairly certain in science, 304-306 ; influenced by fashion and feeling in taste, 306, 307 ; apt to be too favourable, 307-309 ; likely to decline still further as the highest standards are disused, 310, 311
Cromwell, Puritan and Roman elements in, 275 ; adopts promotion by merit, 279 ; impossible in modern England or the United States, 327, 328

DAlton's discovery unsurpassable, 291
Dante perhaps a gainer by exile, 149 ; and by city life, 150 ; proscribed by Rome, 264
Darwin, Erasmus, dreams of, 290, and note
Darwin not a liver in cities, 157 ; proscribed by Rome, 264 ; belief in, 267 ; value of his discovery, 291, 303 ; admirable style of, 312 ; varied work by, 313
Davis, President, eulogised by Gladstone, 4
Death, Black, effects of, 153
Debts, national, often rightly incurred, 170, 171 ; or on plausible grounds, 171 - 173 ; may be dangerous, 173, 174 ; because (1) the State undertakes too much, 174, 175; and (2) then national integrity breaks down under the burden, 175-177
Decrès on the term of service, 119
Democracy, real meaning of, 109, 261
Demosthenes, 315
Diaz, Porfirio, of mixed descent, 55
Dickens as lecturer, 164
Diocesan courts, 195, and note
Directory, French, issues orders denying quarter to Englishmen, 139
Disraeli on Peel, 330
Drake, 262
Dramatic poetry is dying out because passions are weaker, 296-298 ; and because topics have been exhausted, 298, 299
Dryden as a critic, 306, 307
Duff, Grant, on Indian reforms, 83 ; on effects of Thirty Years' War, 90, note
Dumas the younger, 167
Dutch at the Cape, 35, 36 ; in Natal, 36, 37 ; in Java, 42

Ecclesiastical court, powers of, 196
Ecuador, Indians in, 52 ; whites in, 54 ; a tropical Switzerland, 58
Education, State, a necessity, 11
Edward III., debts not yet paid, 177
Eliot, George, restricts her social intercourse, 157 ; was praised for inferior work, 309
Emancipation, slave, a sound bargain, 171
Emigration weakens national feeling, 257, 258
Emigrés, French, disloyal to their country, 190 ; well compensated, 191
England, treatment of children in, 246, and note ; is indebted to alien immi-grants, 285
English debt being reduced, 171
English race, tendency of, to State Socialism, 96-98

Fame always capriciously given, 329-331 ; and likely to be more evenly distributed hereafter than now, 331-333
Family, unit of State, 228 ; powers of the paterfamilias anciently very great, 228-231; the blood -feud, 231-233; rights over life in, 233-235
Family feeling, advantages of, 253-256
Ferrar, Nicholas, 274
Finlay as historian, 313
Flemings, settlement of, in England, 283
Fletcher of Saltouu on Scotch pauperism, 208
Fleury a peace-loving minister, 137
Fonblanque on Peel, 330
Fortescue quoted, 96
Foy, General, on insurrectionary soldiers, 116 ; on reforms in French organisation, 117
Fox, predictions by, 3 ; knew the classics, 311
France, Reign of Terror in, 25, 26 ; increase of population in, 68, 74, 75 ; outstrips England in ironclads, 103 ; adaptable to the stationary state, 105 ; gained by defeat at Sedan, 141 ; education in, 215, 216 ; law and practice of marriage in, 231, 240-243
Francis, St., condemns intellect, 212; compassionates animals, 218
Frederick II. , 46 ; his economical policy, 107 ; his ambition, 137
French army, size of, in 1740, 95, note 2
French princes, profligacy of, 198
French society broken up by the Second
Empire, 158
Frobisher, 262
Froesch wilier, French cuirassiers at, 139
Future life, belief in, impaired, 271, 273

Galados paints Spanish villager, 169
Garibaldi worked as a soap-boiler, 286
Garrick made Shakespeare popular, 307
George IV. not reproved by the Church, 198
Germanic standard of chastity high, 239
Germany is driving out the Poles, 285
Gibbon, estimate by, of Roman subjects, 67 ; criticised by Maurice, 89, note ; his excellent work, 303, 304 ; the best Church historian, 304, and note ; his concision, 313 ; his expectation of life, 323 ; his estimate of the time of the Antonines, 339
Gilbert, admirable work of, 166
Gladstone, eulogy of President Davis by, 4
Gobelins, tapestry of, 107
Goethe on English inventiveness, 102, note 2 ; on progress, 203 ; on the beginnings of a science, 313 ; his literary articles, 318
Goldsmith predicts changes in France, Germany, Holland, and Sweden, 5, 6
Gray's view of the attributes of power, 328
Great men careless of gain, 288 ; their importance circumscribed in modern society, 326, 328
Greeks comparatively exterminated, 69 ; appreciated city life, 147
Grey Town pestilential, 57
Grote, Mrs., disapproves marriage for men of genius, 253
Guaranis, 56 ; docile, 59
Guardia, a half-caste, 56
Guatemala, few whites in, 33, 54
Guerillas of no real utility, 121

Hale, Sir M., uncritical, 305
Hamerton on French society, 202, notes ; vindicates French schools, 224 ; on the effects of marriage, 253
Hamilton, predictions by, 6
Hare's theory popularised by newspaper discussion, 317
Hastings, Warren, not moral, by modern standards, 202 ; his type disappearing, 262
Hawthorne criticises Englishmen, 100
Heine predicts defeat of France by Germany, 7 ; criticises Englishmen, 100 ; his political articles, 318
Henry VIII., his aims 193, and note
Henry's (Patrick) oratory, 314, 315
Herschel on earthquakes, 141
Hindoos, 33, 34 ; increase of, 76 ; have added nothing to thought, 341
Holberg's estimate of Englishmen, 99-101
Holland, education denominational in, 214
Homer perhaps influenced by town life, 150 ; comparatively forgotten, 332
Honduras impossible for Europeans, 57
Horace on barbarian wives, 238, note 1
Hottentots, few, at Cape in 1795, 36
Howe improves sewing-machine, 102, note 1
Hugo, Victor, appreciates John Brown, 6, 7 ; his greatness as a dramatist, 167
Huguenots at the Cape, 35 ; in England, 283
Humaita, 33
Hutton's (R. H. ) work as a journalist, 318
Hyder Ali ravages the Carnatic, 82

Ibsen partially appreciated, 167, 168
Hi, Chinese immigration into, 66 ; massacres in, 82 ; Mahommedanism stamped out in, 131
Immigration, alien rights of, everywhere restrained, 283-285 ; unfortunate consequences of this restraint, 285-287
India, its people too numerous to be exterminated, 34 ; character of reforms in, 83
Indians, 34 ; not dangeroiis in Argentine, 58 ; occupy fertile niches of Peru, etc., 58
Inkerman, English infantry at, 139
Ireland, population in, 68
Irishmen, increase of, 69, 70, 75, 76
Italy adaptable to the stationary state, 105 ; a gainer by war, 141

Japanese, 31, 32
Java, climate of, 42
Jemappes won by half -trained troops, 118
Jevons, Prof., on the coal-measures, 174, note
Jews in Russia, 76-80 ; capable of of agriculture, 77 ; causes of their increase, 78, 79 ; appear a danger to the Empire, 80
Johnson, Dr., a lover of town life, 147 ; social sphere of, 157 ; his estimate of Cowley and Shakespeare, 307 ; of Savage and Gray, 308
Juarez, 33, 55
Junius, a journalist, 318 ; overrated, 319
Juvenal praises city life, with a reservation, 148, 149 ; too vehement for modern times, 293

Kaffirs take refuge under British rule, 36
Kanakas, some qualities of the, 32
Kant's estimate of Englishmen, 99 ; on patriotism, 183
Keble on a moral order, 268, 269
Kempis on predestination, 268 ; his view generally taken, 269
Kloster-Zeven, capitulation of, 122
Knowles, Sheridan, value of success of, 165

Labour, its regulation by law inevitable, 12
Lacordaire, why silenced, 194
Las Casas, 210
Laveleye on communal property, 106
Law, Mississippi scheme of, 177
Leibnitz, his doctrine of eternal life, 272
Lely on Englishmen, 99, note
Lesseps, M. de, vindicates climate of Nicaragua, 57
Lewis, Cornewall, predictions by, 4-6
Life may be prolonged by science, 321, 322 ; and this will be a gain to knowledge, 323 ; and to political order, 323-324 ; but will rob life of brightness and energy, 324-326
Local feeling dying out, 258
London, riotous meetings in, 281
Lords, House of, if abolished, 109
Louis XV., 190 ; censured by the Church, 197, 198
Lowell on patriotism, 183, 184
Loyola's conversion, 269
Luther's old name for the Turks, 133 ; perplexed by the liberty of the Reformation, 195 ; on temptations, 268
Lytton, Bulwer, success of, on the stage, 165

Macaulat on Junius, 319 M'Cormick patents reaping-machine in America, 102, note 1
Machiavel uses uncritical materials, 305
Magyars crowded out in Hungary, 69
Mahommedanism a possible force in China, 131-133
Mahommedans of Yunnan, 34 ; of China, 132
Mahrattas, desolation caused by, 321 Maine's success, 309 ; work in journalism, 318
Maistre, De, paradox by, 141 ; on teaching religion, 216
Malaysia, capabilities of, 42, 43
Malthus, doctrines of, 142
Maories, 32
Marcus Aurelius, 89 ; his despondency, 339
Marlborough superseded by Wellington, 332
Marriage anciently indissoluble, 236-238 ; idea of purity imported into, 238-240 ; the marriage of suitability, 240-243 ; is being superseded by the marriage of inclination, which implies divorce, 243-245 ; and at least tends to weaken the marriage bond, 245-247 ; diminished importance of, favours individualism, 251-253
Mars-la-Tour, heroism of German infantry at, 139
Mashonaland, future of, 31
Matabeleland, future of, 31
Mauritius, decay of French in, 76
Meeting, public right of, everywhere restrained, 281, 282
Meissen, porcelain of, 107
Mejia, 33, 55
Mendez, 56
Merv, 43, note, 44
Meteren's estimate of Englishmen, 99
Mexico, Indians of, not exterminated, 33 ; whites can labour in, 33 ; population of, how composed, 54, 55 ; ruling class white, 56 ; use of guerillas revived in, 121
Michelet on French revolutionary levies, 116
Military education likely to be generalised, 136 ; in some respects advantageous to character, 138-141, 265
Mill condemns State labour, 107, 108 ; a master of style, 311, 312
Milton perhaps a gainer by solitude, 149
Milton a product of Puritan and Hellenic influences, 273 ; his poetry compared with Burke's prose, 300-302
Mirabeau approves Frederick II. 's political economy, 107
Molière may become archaic, 332
Moltke's (Von) soldiers comparatively humane, 141
Monasteries and pauperism, 205, 206
Money, love of, likely to be a permanent force, 333-335 ; will be desired from more selfish motives than now, 335, 336
Montaigne's allusions to well-known names, 332
Morality not easily distinguished from religion, 265
Morazan, 56
More, Sir Thomas, his principles of action, 193 ; his doctrine of prayer, 170
Moreau, a civilian-made soldier, 118
Morocco, 44
Morris, his conception of a reformed England, 27
Mozambique, 35

Napoleon I. , forecasts by, 7, 8 ; estimate of French revolutionary levies by, 117-119 ; his wars reduced French stature, 153 ; he regulates divorce, 238 ; adopts promotion by merit, 279 ; rescued France from anarchy, 326, 327 ; is becoming impossible in France, 328 ; his view of fame, 331
Napoleon, Louis, believed in by English society, 4 ; called a tyrant, 194 ; not reproved by the clergy, 198
Nasmyth, 101 ; his hammer first used in Creuzot, 102
Natal, example of, 36-38
Needle-gun tried and rejected by English officers, 103
Negroes, American, dangerous increase of, 10, 11, 59-63. Appendices A, B Nelson would not be allowed to save the Empire, 202
Newman, J. H., avoids London, 157
Newspapers are superseding the pamphlet, the book of travel, and the philosophical argument, 315-317
Newton discovered the one great secret, 291 ; made it familiar, 303
Nicander Nucius on Englishmen, 99, note Nicaragua, few whites in, 33 ; impossible for Europeans, 57 ; filibusters meant to work in, with slaves, 58
Nicholas I., 9
Nicias, timidity of, 263
Noblemen, English, die out rapidly, 70-73
Novel, the, cannot take the place of poetry, 301, 302

Ogle on the migration of population, 144, 155
Olmsted on comparative health of white and negro, 62
Ontario, education law in, 214
Orissa, famine in, 84
Ortou's (Professor) views about Indians, 52 ; about whites in the Amazon, 53 ; finds an Indian governor, 56
Ovid loathes life out of Eome, 148

Pakenham beaten before New Orleans, 115
Palatines, settlement of, in England, 283
Palmerston controlled by his supporters, 327
Parents and children, legal relations of, 247-249 ; partly superseded by State control, 249-251
Paris like Athens and Eome, 149, 263 Pascal a Jansenist, 274 ; a Puritan of speculative genius, 275 ; a writer for the day's need, 318
Patriotism will become increasingly important, 181, 182 ; a virtue of a peculiar kind, 182-185 ; a very mixed virtue, 185-187 ; is gradually taking definite shape, 187, 188 ; and becoming more possible in its best form, 188-190 ; a higher feeling than loyalty, 190-192
Pauperism in England and Scotland, 208, 209
Pecock, Bishop, disgraced, 213 ; statement of, about population, 339
Peel knew English literature, 311 ; was steadily reviled, 330, 331
Pennsylvania, repudiation by, 176
Pepys, Samuel, 256
Pericles charged with impiety, 262
Persia, population of, 52 ; Shah of, 93
Peru, Indians of, not exterminated, 33 ; a tropical Switzerland, 58 ; early civilisation of, 91
Peter the Great, 8, 46 ; his treatment of his son, 229, 230
Peterborough a typical Englishman, 100
Philip II. 's treatment of his son, 229, 230
Philippe, Louis, a teacher, 284
Philoctetes, 148
Pitt attacked for purity of his life, 201
Pizarro, 33, 34
Plate, Lower, whites can labour in, 33
Plato's imperishable prose, 312
Pliny, social sphere of, 157
Poetry is dying out, except lyrical, 292-295 ; which is becoming richer and more various, 295, 296 ; but which may soon be exhausted, 300, 301, See Drama
Police, how recruited in Loudon, 154, note
Pompey, 239, note 1
Population, increase of, difficult to predict, 67, 68 ; methods to stint may be adopted, 130
Prayer, belief in, modified, 269-271
Protection likely to be adopted by the higher races, 128-130
Protestantism copied Catholicism, 24
Protestants, early outrages by, 200
Prussia a first-rate power, 110
Prussian army, size of, in 1740, 95, note 1
Ptolemais as described by Synesius, 182
Puritans favour Church interference, 196 ; awake to repress incontinence, 198 ; Puritan superstition, 268 ; the Puritan household, 275, 276

Ramus silenced, 213
Reformation, the work of men under forty, 325
Reichshoffen, French cuirassiers at, 139
Rémusat, De, on Juuius, 319
Renaissance, the, excited great hopes, 340
Reuchlin attacked, 213
Revolution, French, the work of men under forty, 325 ; excited great hopes, 340
Revolutions likely to be less violent, 322, 329
Richelieu a dictator, 326
Rochambeau powerfully assists the Americans, 115
Rogers, Professor, on condition of working-class anciently, 127
Roland, Mdme., marriage of, 241, 242 Roman Empire under Trajan, 87, 88 ; causes of its decline, 88, 90 ; despondency attending its break-up, 321
Roman law of marriage, 236
Ross of Bladensburg beats American militia, 115
Rothschild smuggles gold, 184, note
Rousseau predicts Revolution, 5 ; unlike Voltaire, 150 ; his treatment of his children reprobated, 229 ; superstitious experiment by, 268, note 3
Rowe, 307
Russia and Turkestan, 43, 44 ; effects of conquest by, in Turkey in Asia, 63 ; capable of supporting a large population, 105 ; strong for aggression, 110 ; has aims on Persia, 111 ; gained by defeat in Crimea, 141 ; is oppressing Jews and Germans, 285 ; is largely indebted to foreigners, 285 ; Russian army, size of, in 1740, 95 note 1

Saffi taught in Oxford, 286
Saint invents sewing-machine, 102 note 1
St. Aignan, 241.
St. Simon's view of marriage, 241, and note 1
Salvation Army, 156
Sand's (G.) views on marriage, 243-245
Sanguin, 241
San Sebastian, surrender of, 139 ; atrocities at, 140, note
Saragossa, defences of, their character, 120, 121
Sardou, 167
Science not reconcilable with faith, 288-290 ; is ceasing to impress the imagination, 290-292
Scotland, increase of population in, 75
Scotchmen frugal, 169
Scott, Sir W., did admirable work, 301 ; yet may be superseded, 302
Senegambia, 35
Sepoy outrages, 82
Sertorius thought of sailing for the Fortunate Isles, 343
Servants, changed relations of, to employers, 256, 257
Sèvres, porcelain of, 107
Sewell on the typical vertebra, 305
Shaftesbury, Lord, legislation by, 154
Shakespeare on the stage, 165 ; his songs, 168 ; his tragedy of Lear, 297
Shelburne, Lord, prediction by, 2
Shelley on the stage, 165 ; ostracised, 286, 302 ; not read in his lifetime, 331
Sheridan's oratory, 313, 314
Shirley on English pedigrees, 71
Shrewsbury, 210
Sidgwick (Prof. H.) on patriotism, 183
Smith, Adam, on mortality, 153, 154
Smith (H. J. S., Prof.) on constructive chemistry, 291 ; on the crowding-out of talent, 331
Smith, 210
Socialism, State, its essential aims in land laws, 20 ; how it may be introduced, 103-105 ; what influences will modify it, 122, 123 ; it may tend to promote health, 321
Socrates charged with impiety, 262
Spain, possessions of, under Philip II., 92, 93 ; praised for policy, 93 ; capable of supporting a large population, 105
Spaniards, greatness of, 93
Stae'l, Auguste de, advised by Napoleon, 286
Stae'l, Mdme. de, why she loved Paris, 149
State activity, increase of, 18-22 ; value of, to the modern citizen, 224-226
Stationary state, its good and evil, 336-338 ; arguments against it," 339-341 ; invalid, 341, 342
Statistical Bureau of U.S., estimate by, 61
Strafford, a traitor, 190
Straits Settlement, Chinese in, 46, 47, and note
Straw, Jack, confession of, 208, note
Sweden, increase of population in, 70
Swift's view of servants, 256 ; a transcendent journalist, 319 ; on the ill-fate of great men, 329, 330
Swinburne on the stage, 165 ; sometimes irreverent, 201
Szechuen, fluctations of population in, 65

Tacitus praises the Germans, 89 ; social sphere of, 157 ; on German marriages, 235 ; compared with Virgil, 302
Tae-Pings, character of their revolt, 34 ; how put down, 83 ; its effect on society, 34
Taine on English family life, 246, note 1
Talleyrand praises Hamilton, 6 ; his sagacity, 8, and note
Tara, Hill of, meeting at, forbidden, 281
Tarragona, storm of, 140
Tartufe, a representative of the religious man of his day, 274
Temper of European nations likely to change, 130, 131
Tennyson on the stage, 165 ; has changed the Arthurian legend for the worse, 296 ; his view of longevity, 322 ; his optimism, 340
Texas, whites can labour in, 33 ; its precedent, 59
Thackeray as lecturer, 164
Thirty Years' War, 81 ; its effect, 90
Thomas buys patent of sewing-machine, 102, note 1
Ticknor, M., prognostications by, 135, 170
Tocqueville, De, predictions by, 6, 8 ; statement about French society by, 151 ; re-cast a portion of modern history, 303 ; not exhaustive, 304
Towns increasing upon the country, 142, 143 ; partly because of improved communication, 143-145 ; partly because education makes men social and ambitious, 145-147 ; partly because city 'life stimulates talent, 147-150 ; though no fixed law can be laid down as to this, 150-152. But city life is unhealthy, 152-154 : though much is being done to improve it, 154, 155 ; and the town population is only kept vigorous by country immigrants, 155, 156. The old cities were open to country influences, and with a manageable society, 156-158. The tendency is for the individual to dwindle in town -life, 158-160. Family feeling withers up in town, 160-162 ; nor can improved conditions of policy altogether remedy this, 162, 163. On the other hand, towns offer women relief from ennui, 163, 164 ; though the intellectual interests stimulated are not the highest, 164-166 ; as the drama is dying, 166-168 ; the music-hall vulgar, 168. It seems accidental that avarice is less a passion in towns than in the country, 168, 169
Towton, battle of, 13~2
Transylvania, movement of population in, 69
Trevisano, Andrea, on Englishmen, 99, note
Trinidad, the marshes of, pestilential, 57
Tripoli, 44
Tunis, 44
Tschernischevski, dreams of, 290, and note
Turkestan, Eastern, 43, note, 44
Turkestan, Western, Russia may colonise, 45
Turkish Empire, dissolution of, predicted, 8 ; inevitable, 45 ; greatness of, in 16th century, 93
Turks depress higher races, 68 ; moral character of, 94, 95 ; how called by Luther, 133
Tyler's followers behead an archbishop, 208

Underhill, 210
United States filling up rapidly, 14, 15; the better for the War of Independence, 141 ; urban population in, 142, 143

Valerius, Maximus, on continence, 239
Valmy, a victory by half-trained troops, 118
Venezuela, described by Eastwick, 59
Verbrugghe, M., defends climate of Nicaragua, 57
Victoria and State landlordism, 19 ; State employees in, 21, 22 ; effects of Chinese labour in, 125 ; clergy of, oppose State education, 215 ; having failed to educate, 215 ; law of divorce in, 239 ; Medical Board of, refused to register a Chinese doctor, 283, 284 ; its teaching service a close one, 284 ; death-rate of children in, 322
Virginia, a mere breeding-place, 210
Voltaire on earthquakes, 141 ; his influence, 150 ; on Shakespeare, 307

Walpole, a peace-loving Minister, 137
War never likely to be replaced by arbitration, 136-138
Webster, 167
Wellington, predictions by, 3, 4 ; wrong forecast of, by Napoleon, 8 ; forbids English and French outposts to mingle, 140, note ; extenuates atrocities at San Sebastian, 141
Wieliczka, mine of, 107
Wiener's views about Indians in Peru, 52, 53 ; knows a half-caste priest, 56
Women, how affected by changes in society, 276-279
Wurtemberg, depopulation of, in Thirty Years' War, 81, 82

Ynglinga Saga, quoted, 343
York, Duke of, employed, though provedly incapable, 280
Young's (Arthur) sound estimate of the Revolution, 6
Yunnan, 34 ; massacres in, 82 ; Mahommedanism stamped out in, 131

Zambesi, anticipations about the region of the, 33
Zealand, New, and progressive land-tax, 19, 329
Zulus, 36, 37