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OUR NEW ZEALAND COUSINS.

LONDON:
PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, LIMITED,
ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL ROAD.

OUR NEW ZEALAND

COUSINS



BY


The Hon. JAMES INGLIS

("Maori"),

MINISTER OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION IN THE NEW SOUTH WALES LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY;
AUTHOR OF "SPORT AND WORK ON THE NEPAUL FRONTIER,"
"OUR AUSTRALIAN COUSINS," ETC., ETC.



London:

SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE, AND RIVINGTON

CROWN BUILDINGS, 188, FLEET STREET

1887

[All rights reserved]

PREFACE.




The first chapter of this book explains the circumstances under which I undertook the work, and renders a long preface unnecessary.

Being originally written for the Sydney Press, my descriptions, penned as we journeyed, have all the drawbacks incident to hasty composition; but I have had so many, and so gratifying requests, to have the letters published in book form, by friends, whose good opinion is dear to me, that I feel it would be prudish to refuse. Frankly confessing my shortcomings therefore, I throw myself once more on the merciful consideration of my critics.

Allusions and comparisons, will be found scattered at intervals through the book, which are more peculiarly applicable to Australians, than to the wider circle of readers at home; but as, I believe, such references may be found to incidentally illusrate phases of Colonial life, and circumstance, I have deemed it on the whole better to retain them.

Mindful of former criticism, I have honestly tried to "prune my style," and curb my natural exuberance of expression; but alas! I am conscious that I have yet much to learn, and that there is great room for improvement in these and other respects.

However, if the reader will accept my pages, as a homely unpretending record of a very delightful trip, through "The Wonderland of the South Pacific," I hope my comments on what we witnessed, and my revelation of the change and progress, effected by twenty years of colonization, may prove both interesting and instructive.

I have tried to describe simply and truthfully what I saw, and what I thought. My most earnest hope is, that what I have written may enkindle in the hearts of our kinsmen in the dear old mother land, who may read this book, a livelier, deeper, and kindlier interest in the fortunes of their loyal and loving Cousins, of Australia and New Zealand.

J.I.

Craigo, Strathfield, Sydney, N.S.W.
May, 1886.

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.