Page:British Flowering Plants.djvu/23

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9
INTRODUCTION

said to be lobate, but when completely divided into several distinct leaflets it is said to be compound.

A leaf is said to be palmately lobed when the divisions do not extend to the middle (fig. 43), fissured when they reach nearly to the middle (fig. 44), cleft when they reach beyond the middle(fig 45). It is simple or entire when undivided (fig. 50).

A palmate leaf is called compound when it divides into several radiating leaflets at the end of the leaf-stalk (fig. 46).

A leaf is pinnately lobed when the incisions are only slight (fig. 47), and fissured or cleft when they are deeper (figs. 48 and 49).

Leaves may also be entire (fig. 51), lobate (fig. 47), or fissured or cleft (figs. 48, 49).

Fig. 52 illustrates a pinnate leaf which has several secondary leaves, called leaflets, on the sides of the leaf-stalk.

When a palmate leaf consists of three leaf as in clover, it is called ternate or trifoliate (fig. 53); and a greater number of leaflets, similarly arranged, is shown at figs. 54-6.