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17


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power of Mohammedanism (especially in Nigeria), the orgies of paganism, as well as anti-Catholic propacanda particularly rife in South Africa. Treacherous climatic conditions and financial need enhance the hundship of the missionary. This latter was felt especially during the war, due to the cessa- tion of contributions from nations at war. The enlistment of missionary priests and students, the closing of seminaries (Paris, Lyons, Steyl, etc.), left comparatively few to carry on the evangeliza- tion of the African native. Especially did the missions in the former German colonies suffer. The German clergy were deported or interned, and the missions left desolate. In Kamerim the Fallotines were replaced by the Fathers of the Holy Ghost; the prefecture of Adamawa was assigned to the priests of the Sacred Heart; in German East Africa the White Fathers carried on the work of the Bavarian Benedictines. Untrained African minds with difficulty reconciled the war in which they took

Eart with the (xospel of Peace preached to them. »ut in spite of these hardships of war Catholicism flourished. The abandoned missions are regaining their. former prosperity. In Khartum some of the interned priests have returned. That Americans are now fi^nng the task of evangelization is witnessed by the American members of the Holy Ghost Order in Africa, the La Salette priests ordained in 10^ for African missions, and the women who have taken their vows in African sisterhoods. One of the glories of the Chiu^h in Africa is the beatification (6 June, 1920) of the martyrs of Uganda. On the same date three natives of Uganda were ordained priests at Villa Maria and four others received


minor orders. The Congo and Nigeria have each ordained a native priest. In Madagascar the Jesuits have erected a seminary for natives. These native clergy, through their knowledge of languages and cus- toms, as well as their example, are a great help to the missionaries. The catechists also are zealous aids. The leper colonies are a special labor of charity, this dread disease being prevalent along the east coast of Africa. In leaser ailments, curing the body to save the soul is also a great work of the mis- sionaiy. Among the tribes converted in great num- bers to the Church are the Baganda, the Babemba of Rhodesia, and the Kabyles. The king and queen of the Mendes tribe in Sierra Leone are Catholics, as is also the supreme chief of the Basutos,. who recently visited London. In Belgian Congo the missions are flourishing. A special effort is being made to evangelize the schismatic Copts of Egypt, and among the Americo-Liberians and in Nigeria there is great scope for work. On board the ship "Africa" which sank 6 January, 1920, were one bishop, ten priests, six brothers, one seminarian, and one nun, all members of the Holy Ghost Order, bound for Africa. An official document of impor- tance to African missions is the mandate for East Africa recently issued, by the terms of which com-

Slete religious liberty is granted in that territory, lany new vicariates and prefectures have been erected in the last several years. The Catholic missions in Africa are listed in the table below, with date of establishment, title, and the society in charge of each. The table following gives the num- ber of dioceses, vicariates and prefectures apostolic assigned to each society.


CATHOLIC AFRICA


Date of





Date of





Ereo-


Name


Title


Qergy


Erec-


Name


Title


Clergy


tion





tion






Alexandria (1805)


Coptic Patri-


Secular Clergy


1848


Mayotte Islands, No6si-B«, Co-


Prefecture


Fathers of the Holy




archate





Ghost


CcBtuxy


Alexandria


Armenian Bish-


Secular Clergy



mores




•*


opric



1850


Saint-Denis (Re-


Bishoprio


Fathers of the Holy


Hennopoli8(1805)


Coptic Bishop-


Secular Clergy



union)



Ghost




ric



1850


Natal


Vicariate


Oblates of Mary



Thebes (1805)


Ck>ptic Bishop-


Secular Qergy


1852


Port Victoria (1802)


Bishopric


Capuchins



te


ric



1S55


Fernando Po (1904)


Vicariate


Missionaries of the


m


Carthage (1884)


Archbishopric


Secular Qergy





Immaculate Heart


1334


Moroceo (1006)


Vicariate


Franciscans





of Mary Fathers of the Holy


1263


Ceuta (and Cadis,


Bishoprio


Secular C^gy


1858


Sierra Leone


Vicariate



^8**) ,







Ghost


1400


Cananes (Las Pal- mas)


Bishopric


Secular Clergy


1860


Benin


Vicariate


African Missions of

Lyons Fathers of the Holy


1514


Funchal (Madeira)


Bishopric


Secular (^ergy


1860


Zanxibar (Northern


Vicariate


1532


Sfto Thiaffo de Gabo Verde


Bishoprio


Secular Clergy



Zanguebar)



Ghost





1863


Senegambia


Vicariate


Fathers of the Holy


1534


Angra (Azores)


Bishopric


Secular (^ergy





Ghost


15S4


Saint Thomas


Bishopric


Secular Clergy


1866


Oran


Bishoprio


Secular CSergy


1586


Angola and Ck>ngo


Bishoprio


Fathers of the Holy


1866


Ckinstantine


Bishopric


Secular Clergy





Ghost


1868


Sahara [Bamako


Vicariates


White Fathers


1613


Mosambique


Prelaturenullius


Secular Clergy



(1921) and Wagh-




1640


Lower Congo (1865)


Prefecture


Fathers of the Holy



adugu (19201 Cape of (3ood Hope







Ghost


1874


Prefecture


Secular Clergy


1654


Tripoli (Libya, 1913)


Vicariate


Franciscans



(Central)







1879


Upper Cimebasia


Prefecture


Fathers of the Holy


1763


oenegai


Prefecture


Fathers of the Holy





Ghost





Ghost


1879


Gold Cota/L


Vicariate


African Missions of


1813


Cape of Good Hope (Western)


Vicariate


Secular Clergy





Lyons





1879


Zambesia (1905)


Prefecture


Jesuits


1819


Teneriffe (San Ois-


Bishopric


Secular Clergy


1880


Upper CTongo


Vicariate


White Fathers



t o b a I de la




1880


Tanganyika (1886)


Vicariate


White Fathers



Laguna)




1882


Dahomey


Vicariate


African Missions of


1838


Algiers (1886)


Archbishopric


Secular CSergy





Lyons


1888


Absrssinia


Vicariate


Lasarista


1883


Victoria-Ny ansa


Vicariate


White Fathers


1830


Egvpt (Saboon


Vicariate


Franciscans



(1915)




1813


Vicariate


Fathers of the Holy Ghost


1884


Upper Nigeria


Vicariate


African Missions of Lyons


1844


Tananarive (Cen- tral Madagascar)


Vicariate


Jesuits


1884


Orange River (1808)


Vicariate


Oblates of St. Francis of Sales


1346


Gallas


Vicariate


Capuchins


1885


Lower Nigeria


Vicariate


Fathers of the Holy


1840


Sudan (Khartum,


Vicariate


Sons of the Sacred



(1920)



Ghost



1913)



Heart (Verona)


1885


DelU of the Nile


Vicariate


African Missions of


1847


Cape of Good Hope


Vicariate


Secular Clergy



(1909)



Lyons



(Eastern)




1886


Kimberly in Orange


Vicariate


Benedictines of the


1847


Port Louis (Mau-


Bishopric


Fathers of the Holy





Primitive Obser-



ritius)



Ghost





vance