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Henry the Fifth, IV. v
89
 

thinks—the most brave, valorous, and thrice-
worthy signieur of England. 68

Pist. As I suck blood, I will some mercy show.—
Follow me!

Boy. Suivez-vous le grand capitaine. [Exeunt
Pistol and French Soldier.] I did never know so 72
full a voice issue from so empty a heart: but the
saying is true, 'The empty vessel makes the great-
est sound.' Bardolph and Nym had ten times
more valour than this roaring devil i' the old play, 76
that every one may pare his nails with a wooden
dagger; and they are both hanged; and so would
this be if he durst steal anything adventurously.
I must stay with the lackeys, with the luggage 80
of our camp: the French might have a good
prey of us, if he knew of it; for there is none to
guard it but boys. Exit.


 

Scene Five

[Another Part of the Field]

Enter Constable, Orleans, Bourbon, Dauphin, and Rambures.

 

Con. O diable!

Orl. O seigneur! le jour est perdu! tout est perdu!

Dau. Mort de ma vie! all is confounded, all!
Reproach and everlasting shame 4
Sit mocking in our plumes. O méchante fortune!
Do not run away. A short alarum.

Con.Why, all our ranks are broke.

Dau. O perdurable shame! let's stab ourselves.
Be these the wretches that we play'd at dice for? 8


76 devil i' the old play; cf. n.

7 perdurable: everlasting