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151
The P. C. and P. O.

girl, in a brown hat and blue dress, with a round face and snubby nose, went and bought it for her mother. She lugged it home, cut it up, and boiled it in the big pot ; mashed some of it, with salt and butter, for dinner ; and to the rest she added a pint of milk, two eggs, four spoons of sugar, nutmeg, and some crackers; put it in a deep dish, and baked it till it was brown and nice ; and next day it was eaten by a family named March.

T. TUPMAN.


Mr. Pickwick, Sir: —

I address you upon the subject of sin the sinner I mean is a man named Winkle who makes trouble in his club by laughing and sometimes won't write his piece in this fine paper I hope you will pardon his badness and let him send a French fable be- cause he can't write out of his head as he has so many lessons to do and no brains in future I will try to take time by the fetlock and prepare some work which will be all commy la fo that means all right I am in haste as it is nearly school time

Yours respectably N. "Winkle.

[The above is amanly and handsome acknowledgment of past misdemean- ors. If our young friend studied punctuation, it would be well.]


A SAD ACCIDENT.

On Friday last, we were startled by a violent shock in our basement, followed by cries of distress. On rushing, in a body, to the cellar, we discovered our beloved President prostrate upon the floor, having tripped and fallen while getting wood for domestic purposes, A perfect ficene of ruin met our eyes; for in his fall Mr. Pickwick had plunged his head and shoulders into a tub of water, upset a keg of soft soap upon his manly form, and torn his gar- ments badly. On being removed from this perilous situation, it was discovered that he had sufiered no injury but sevei-al bruises; and, we are happy to add, is now doing well.

Ed.


THE PUBLIC BEREAVEMENT.

It is our painful duty to record the sudden and mysterious disap- pearance of our cherished friend, Mrs. Snowball Pat Paw. This love- ly and beloved cat was the pet of a large circle of warm and admiring friends ; for her beauty attracted all eyes, her graces and virtues en- deared her to all hearts, and her loss is deeply felt by the whole community.

When last seen, she was sitting at the gate, watching the butcher's cart ; and it is feared that some vil- lain, tempted by her charms, basely stole her. Weeks have passed, but no trace of her has been discovered ; and we relinquish all hope, tie a black ribbon to her basket, set aside her dish, and weep for her as one lost to us forever.


A sympathizing friend sends the following gem : —

A LAMENT

FOR S. B. PAT PAW.

We mourn the loss of our little pet, And sigh o'er her hapless fate, For never more by the fire she'll sit, Nor play by the old green gate.