Page:Notes and Queries - Series 11 - Volume 11.djvu/75

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n B. XL JAN. 23, 1915.] N OTES AND QUERIES.


65


Shall the tongue and sword of a stranger

Give the law in a freeman's home ? Shall our men, strong in righteous anger, From this hireling host meet their doom From this hireling host meet their doom ? Great God ! shall hands that are fettered Bow down our necks to the yoke, And shall by a vile despot's stroke All our hard-won liberties be shattered ? To arms, ye men of France ! form up your ranks

once more :

March on, maich on, and let our fields be drenched with felon gore !

Tremble, ye tyrants ! and if spies there be

By every loyal soul abhorred Let them tremble top, for their treachery Now shall meet with its due reward Now shall meet with its due reward ! Foes like these make each man a fighter ; And if our heroes needs must fall, Their country, at their dying call, Will bring forth yet more sons to right her 1 To arms, ye men of France ! form up your ranks

once more !

March on, march on, and let our fields be drenched with felon gore !

O may each son of the land of chivalry Guide his strokes as a gentle knight : Spare the poor tools of others' rivalry Who against us unwillingly fight Who against us unwillingly fight. But to the despot bloody-handed, And all of his monster brood, Requite in iron and in blood The doom that they for us intended ! To arms, ye men of Fiance ! form up your ranks

once more :

March on, march on, and let our fields be drenched with felon gore !

O sacred love of our sweet country,

Do thou our guide, our guardian be ; Liberty, O cherished Liberty,

Fight with those who now fight for thee Fight with those who now fight for thee ! To our old flag, famous in story, Let victory come at thy call ; And let thy foemen, as they fall, Behold thy triumph and our glory. To arms, ye men of France ! form up your ranks

once more 1

March on, march on, and let our fields be drenched with felon gore.

So will we tread, with hearts high beating,

The path our fathers trod of old ; From its dust they send us their greeting, And their memory makes us bold And their memory makes us bold. 'Tis not life, but honour, we cherish ; Their grave we joyfully will share : Be this our highest pride and care To avenge them, or like them to perish ! To arms, ye men of France ! form up your ranks

once more :

March on, maich on, and let our fields be drenched with felon gore !

KATE NORGATE.


ST. THOMAS'S CHURCH, BEGENT STREET, The recent rebuilding of premises facing New Burlington Street disclosed the west front of this unfamiliar eighteenth-century edifice. Named after its founder, Arch- bishop Tenison's Chapel and School, a timberwork structure provided in 1688, had to be replaced in 1702 by the ex- isting building. The site was, on 27 Jan., 1692, granted as a freehold, " for good and charitable causes," by William and Mary to Dr. Tenison, and measured 200ft. east to west by 96 ft. north to south, the frontages being in King Street on the east, and " Marybone Lane alias Swallow Street " on the west.

First styled an oratory or tabernacle, it was popularly known as " the oratory in King Street," and not until about 1823 was its present title first used.

The history of the church and its site has been adequately recorded in ' The History of St. Thomas's Church, Begent Street,' " printed for the author," the Bev. Arthur Jackson, in 1881.

The minutes of the trustees' proceedings afford many interesting references to this locality, that still wants an historian. For example, in 1710 it is ordered " that the agent, in the name of this trust, go to the persons chiefly concerned in the Bear Garden now setting up in Benjamin Street near the chapel, and acquaint them that if they proceed with such a nuisance so near the chapel and serious a neighbourhood, all lawful causes shall be taken to remove them to a greater distance."

The western approach, from Swallow Street, was of course much curtailed when Begent Street was planned, but an opening between the houses and a forecourt remained, and is shown in Georg3 Thompson's ' Plan of the Parish of St. James, Westminster,' 1825. The buildings which will soon screen the church from the great thoroughfare will probably be twice the height of, and infinitely more magnificent than, Nash's ambitious designs which they replace. The fragment of the eighteenth century will remain half hidden : a delightful haven to the lover of old London until it is demolished for further improvements and extensions.

ALECK ABRAHAMS.

" WANGLE." The meanings given in the dictionary to this word are " to wag, to dangle, to totter." It appears to be Scottish dialect in origin.

I have heard it used in a novel sense in or after August last year, when inquiring as to the reason for stamping the policies issued by the Government War Bisks Insurance