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NOTES OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

the substantials, we did not forget the egg-nogg, apple toddy, etc., which commanded a proportionate degree of respect and consideration, and I must confess that I was a little tipsy.

George, when you receive this letter you will please show and read it to all my inquiring friends, and answer it as soon as you can, and give me all the particulars about the old Hoffman school-house; also give my love to all the pretty girls, the ugly ones need not apply. I have written a great many letters home but only received a few in return. Whether my friends have deserted me, or turned traitors against me is yet to be known, but I hope I will soon hear the result by the next mail from Vera Cruz. Your friend, J. J. O.

Three Locks, five miles above Lewistown, Pa.

Friday, December 31, 1847.—This morning Capt. Binder, of Co. E, First Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, got permission from Col. F. M. Wynkoop to go in search of his Orderly, Sergt. Hudtner, who has been missing for several days, but soon returned without hearing or seeing anything of him. It is supposed the guerillas killed him and then threw his body in a ditch or amongst the polque bushes, which are very thick here.

In the afternoon we formed and marched up to the main plaza of San Angel, and were there inspected and mustered into the United States service for the fourth time, by Capt. Joseph Hooker, Assistant Adjutant General, who won special laurels in the valley of Mexico as aide to Gen. Scott.

In the evening a report came to our quarters that two of our men were found dead out at Contreras battle-ground. So Col. Jack Hays, with his mounted Texas Rangers, went out in pursuit of the guerillas, but returned without seeing anything of them. Late in the evening Co. K had all sorts of a frolic, in honor of the election of Wm. F. Mann, as lieutenant. This is the way the last day of the year 1847 is spent, now fast approaching its end, never again to have any more sport, frolic or battles in 1847. We are now better than one year