Page:Philosophical Transactions - Volume 095.djvu/83

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69
on the cohesion of fluids

conjointly, or as the ordinate inversely, and directly as the sine of elevation; therefore the fluxion of the ordinate multiplied by the ordinate is equal to the fluxion of any circle of curvature multiplied by its corresponding height, and by the sine, and divided by the radius: but the fluxion of the circle multiplied by the sine and divided by the radius, is equal to the fluxion of the versed sine; therefore the ordinate multiplied by its fluxion is equal to the initial height multiplied by the fluxion of the versed sine, in the corresponding circle of curvature; and the square of the ordinate is equal to the rectangle contained by the initial height and twice the versed sine, increased by a constant quantity. Now at the highest point of the curve, the versed sine becomes equal to the diameter, and the square of the initial height to the rectangle contained by the initial height and twice the diameter, with the constant quantity: the constant quantity is therefore equal to the rectangle contained by the initial height and its difference from twice the diameter: this constant quantity is the square of the least ordinate, and the ordinate is every where a mean proportional between the greatest height and the same height diminished by twice the versed sine of the angular depression in the corresponding circle of curvature. Again, at the vertical point, the square of the ordinate is equal to the square of the greatest height diminished by the rectangle contained by this height and the diameter of the corresponding circle of curvature, a rectangle which is constant for every fluid, and which may be called the appropriate rectangle: deducting this rectangle from the square of the ordinate at the vertical point, we have the least ordinate; which consequently vanishes when the square of the ordinate at the vertical point is equal to the appropriate rectangle; the horizontal surface becoming in this case an asymptote to the curve, and the