Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 91.djvu/767

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Popular Science Monthly

��751

��This Kerosene Lamp Has a Horizontal Wick

TO the thousands of people still obliged to rely upon kerosene as their means of illumination, this new angle-lamp will be decidedly welcome. The outstanding fea-

��Oil container

���Oil flows from the tank through a vent until the level of the oil about the wick covers the vent

��ture is the position of the wick and burner, which, instead of being vertical, is almost hor- izontal. This shape not only permits a separa- tion of the burner and the tank for oil, but also gives a much better dis- tribution of the light. The old style oil lamp cuts off entirely the rays directed vertically downward, which are the very best for illuminating purposes. In the angle-lamp the flame is at one side of the support, instead of above, so that the downward rays are not interrupted. Whether a wall lamp or a hanging lamp is used, a good light thus falls on the work or paper underneath.

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��The oil travels to the flame through the wick easily. The supply at the base of the wick is kept constant by a device much like th? t in the student lamp. Oil flows from the tank through a vent until the level of the oil about the wick covers the vent; then no more can escape until the supply about the wick has been nearly used up and the level falls below the vent.

As the tank is at some distance from the burner, and not underneath it, it can be lifted out for refilling without dismantling the lamp, or even extinguishing the flame. This assures safety, and also means much less work for the caretaker. The lamp is lighted by swinging the globe-holder on its hinge; this eliminates removing the globe. The air enters through the burner at right angles to the direc- tion of escape through the globe. This com- pels it to eddy back through the flame before it escapes.

���As the tank is at some

distance from the burn- A Bungalow Takes

er, it can be lifted out for **

refilling without dis- a Sail Across San mantling the lamp Francisco Bay

ACALIFORNIA millionaire purchased a plot of ground on the opposite side of the bay from his residence. A moving contractor took the contract to move the house across the bay, and the bungalow is shown below on the scow, ready for the trip. A small tug-boat hauled it.

���The bungalow taking its trip across the bay in preference to a long detour by land. It was loaded on a scow and hauled by a tug-boat, reaching its destination in a few hours

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