Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 91.djvu/959

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Winning an Athlete's Laurels

V. — Indoor jumping events

This article is the last one of a series of five. The other four will be found in the April, May, June, and July issues of 1917.

By Albert B. Wegener

��THERE is no difference between indoor and outdoor jumping except in equip- ment. There is only one distinctive indoor jumping event. It is the running high jump with the spring-board, the highest point of which is not more than 20 in. from the floor. The jump is done in the same manner as the regular event and the rules of that event govern. The only weight event that is in general use indoors is the shot put. There is no difference between this and the outdoor event except that a leather-covered shot is used.

Indoor Vaulting Events

The pole vault indoors is exactly like the outdoor event except in equipment. The rope vault is a variation of the pole vault. It is done with an ordinary climbing rope such as is found in gymnasiums,

��vault. Some vaulters prefer not to make a turn in clearing the bar. The jump should be made before the rope comes to a vertical position during its forward swing. In the two-run style the vaulter grasps the rope, runs and swings forward until his chest almost touches the cross-bar, then swings and runs backward, then forward the second time and then vaults.

The rope may be of any length or thickness, suspended from the ceiling or beams. No assisting devices, such as knots or cross-bars, are allowed. The lower end of the rope is not higher than

���In the single run the vaulter grasps the end of the rope as far back as he can, runs forward and grasps the rope with both hands and completes the movement as in the pole vault

��suspended from the ceiling. It is a much safer event for beginners than the pole vault, for which it serves as good pre- liminary training.

There are two good styles of rope vault- ing, the single run, and the double run. In the single run the vaulter grasps the end of the rope as far back as he can, runs forward and grasps the rope with both hands about 6 in. above the head and completes the movement as in the pole

��1 8 in. from the floor. The jumping stand- ards must be placed so that when the bar is 5 ft. from the floor the end of the taut rope will just touch it. Standards must not be moved from that spot. The lower hand may be shifted to, but not above, the upper, and the upper hand must not be moved after the start. Contestants must clear the bar at least on the second forward swing. The feet may be used in running forward and backward and in springing

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