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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/149

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109
109
LOVE'S LAST ADIEU.

9.

The mouldering marble lasts its day,
Yet falls at length an useless fane;
To Ruin's ruthless fangs a prey,
The wrecks of pillar'd Pride remain.


10.

What, though the sculpture be destroy'd,
From dark Oblivion meant to guard;
A bright renown shall be enjoy'd,
By those, whose virtues claim reward.


11.

Then do not say the common lot
Of all lies deep in Lethe's wave;
Some few who ne'er will be forgot
Shall burst the bondage of the grave.

1806.


LOVE'S LAST ADIEU.

Ἀεὶ δ' ἀεί με φεύγει.—[Pseud.] Anacreon, [Εἰς χρυσὸν].

1.

The roses of Love glad the garden of life,
Though nurtur'd 'mid weeds dropping pestilent dew,
Till Time crops the leaves with unmerciful knife,
Or prunes them for ever, in Love's last adieu!