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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/208

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168
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

Thus Nisus all his fond affection prov'd—
Dying, revenged the fate of him he lov'd;
Then on his bosom sought his wonted place[1]
And death was heavenly, in his friend's embrace!400


Celestial pair! if aught my verse can claim,
Wafted on Time's broad pinion, yours is fame![2]
Ages on ages shall your fate admire,
No future day shall see your names expire,
While stands the Capitol, immortal dome!
And vanquish'd millions hail their Empress, Rome!


TRANSLATION FROM THE "MEDEA" OF EURIPIDES [Ll. 627-660].

Ἔρωτες ὑπὲρ μὲν ἄγαν, κ.τ.λ.[3]

1.

When fierce conflicting passions urge
The breast, where love is wont to glow,
What mind can stem the stormy surge

Which rolls the tide of human woe?
  1. Then on his breast he sought his wonted place,
    And Death was lovely in his Friend's embrace.—[MS. Newstead.]

  2. Yours are the fairest wreaths of endless Fame.—[MS. Newstead.]
  3. [The Greek heading does not appear in Hours of Idleness or Poems O. and T.]