Open main menu

Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/217

This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
177
THE DEATH OF CALMAR AND ORLA.


E'en now the gulf appears in view,
Where unlamented you must lie:[1]
Oblivion's blackening lake is seen,
Convuls'd by gales you cannot weather,
Where you, and eke your gentle queen,
Alas! must perish altogether.


THE DEATH OF CALMAR AND ORLA.[2]

AN IMITATION OF MACPHERSON'S "OSSIAN."[3]

Dear are the days of youth! Age dwells on their remembrance through the mist of time. In the twilight he recalls the sunny hours of morn. He lifts his spear with trembling hand. "Not thus feebly did I raise the steel before my fathers!" Past is the race of heroes! But their fame rises on the harp; their souls ride on the wings of the wind; they hear the sound through the sighs of the storm, and rejoice in their hall of clouds. Such is Calmar. The grey stone marks his narrow house. He looks down from eddying tempests: he rolls his form in the whirlwind, and hovers on the blast of the mountain.

  1. Where you are doomed in death to lie.—[MS. Newstead.]
  2. [The MS. is preserved at Newstead.]
  3. It may be necessary to observe, that the story, though considerably varied in the catastrophe, is taken from "Nisus and Euryalus," of which episode a translation is already given in the present volume [see pp. 151-168].