Open main menu

Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/233

This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
193
WHEN I ROVED A YOUNG HIGHLANDER.

One image, alone, on my bosom impress'd,
I lov'd my bleak regions, nor panted for new;
And few were my wants, for my wishes were bless'd,
And pure were my thoughts, for my soul was with you.


3.

I arose with the dawn, with my dog as my guide,
From mountain to mountain I bounded along;
I breasted[1] the billows of Dee's[2] rushing tide,
And heard at a distance the Highlander's song:
At eve, on my heath-cover'd couch of repose,
No dreams, save of Mary, were spread to my view;
And warm to the skies my devotions arose,
For the first of my prayers was a blessing on you.


4.

I left my bleak home, and my visions are gone;
The mountains are vanish'd, my youth is no more;
As the last of my race, I must wither alone,
And delight but in days, I have witness'd before:
Ah! splendour has rais'd, but embitter'd my lot;
More dear were the scenes which my infancy knew:
Though my hopes may have fail'd, yet they are not forgot,
Though cold is my heart, still it lingers with you.


  1. "Breasting the lofty surge" (Shakespeare).
  2. The Dee is a beautiful river, which rises near Mar Lodge, and falls into the sea at New Aberdeen.