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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/250

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210
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

Blest by the tongues that charm'd my youthful ear,
Mourn'd by the few my soul acknowledged here;
Deplor'd by those in early days allied,
And unremember'd by the world beside.

September 2, 1807.


FRAGMENT.

WRITTEN SHORTLY AFTER THE MARRIAGE OF MISS CHAWORTH.[1]

1.

Hills of Annesley, Bleak and Barren,
Where my thoughtless Childhood stray'd,
How the northern Tempests, warring,
Howl above thy tufted Shade!


  1. [Miss Chaworth was married to John Musters, Esq., in August, 1805. The stanzas were first published in Moore's Letters and Journals of Lord Byron, 1830, i. 56. (See, too, The Dream, st. ii. l. 9.) The original MS. (which is in the possession of Mrs. Chaworth Musters) formerly belonged to Miss E. B. Pigot, according to whom they "were written by Lord Byron in 1804." "We were reading Burns' Farewell to Ayrshire

    Scenes of woe and Scenes of pleasure
    Scenes that former thoughts renew
    Scenes of woe and scenes of pleasure
    Now a sad and last adieu, etc.

    when he said, 'I like that metre; let me try it,' and taking up a pencil, wrote those on the other side in an instant. I