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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/269

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OSSIAN'S ADDRESS TO THE SUN IN "CARTHON."

Rose whom the Deities above,
From Jove to Hebe, dearly love,
When Cytherea's blooming Boy,
Flies lightly through the dance of Joy,
With him the Graces then combine,
And rosy wreaths their locks entwine.
Then will I sing divinely crown'd,
With dusky leaves my temples bound—
Lyæus! in thy bowers of pleasure,
I'll wake a wildly thrilling measure.
There will my gentle Girl and I,
Along the mazes sportive fly,
Will bend before thy potent throne—
Rose, Wine, and Beauty, all my own.

1805.


[OSSIAN'S ADDRESS TO THE SUN IN "CARTHON."[1]]

Oh! thou that roll'st above thy glorious Fire,
Round as the shield which grac'd my godlike Sire,
Whence are the beams, O Sun! thy endless blaze,
Which far eclipse each minor Glory's rays?
Forth in thy Beauty here thou deign'st to shine!

Night quits her car, the twinkling stars decline;
  1. [From an autograph MS. at Newstead, now for the first time printed. (See Ossian's Poems, London, 1819, pp. xvii. 119.)]