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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/276

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236
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

5.

There is a Lip, which mine has prest,
But none had ever prest before;
It vowed to make me sweetly blest,
That mine alone should press it more.[1]


6.

There is a Bosom all my own,
Has pillow'd oft this aching head,
A Mouth which smiles on me alone,
An Eye, whose tears with mine are shed.


7.

There are two Hearts whose movements thrill,
In unison so closely sweet,
That Pulse to Pulse responsive still
They Both must heave, or cease to beat.


8.

There are two Souls, whose equal flow
In gentle stream so calmly run,
That when they part—they part?—ah no!
They cannot part—those Souls are One.

[George Gordon, Lord] Byron.

  1. And mine, mine only.—[Knight and Lacy, v. 56.]