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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/308

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268
HOURS OF IDLENESS.

REMIND ME NOT, REMIND ME NOT.[1]

1.

Remind me not, remind me not,
Of those beloved, those vanish'd hours,
When all my soul was given to thee;
Hours that may never be forgot,
Till Time unnerves our vital powers,
And thou and I shall cease to be.


    But as your blood with dangerous passion boils,
    Beware! and fly from Venus' silken toils:
    Ah! let the head protect the weaker heart,
    And Wisdom's Ægis turn on Beauty's dart.

    *****

    But if 'tis fix'd that every lord must pair,
    And you and Newstead must not want an heir,
    Lose not your pains, and scour the country round,
    To find a treasure that can ne'er be found!
    No! take the first the town or court affords,
    Trick'd out to stock a market for the lords;
    By chance perhaps your luckier choice may fall
    On one, though wicked, not the worst of all:

    *****

    One though perhaps as any Maxwell free,
    Yet scarce a copy, Claribel, of thee;
    Not very ugly, and not very old,
    A little pert indeed, but not a scold;
    One that, in short, may help to lead a life
    Not farther much from comfort than from strife;
    And when she dies, and disappoints your fears,
    Shall leave some joys for your declining years.


    But, as your early youth some time allows,

    Nor custom yet demands you for a spouse,

  1. A Love Song. To ——.—[Imit. and Transl., p. 197.]