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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/118

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S6 THE GIAOUR. Fair clime ! where every season smiles'- Benignant o'er those blessed isles, Which, seen from far Colonna's height, Make glad the heart that hails the sight, lo And lend to loneliness delight. There mildly dimpling, Ocean's cheek Reflects the tints of many a peak Caught by the laughing tides that lave These Edens of the eastern wave : And if at times a transient breeze Break the blue crystal of the seas, Or sweep one blossom from the trees, How welcome is each gentle air That wakes and wafts the odours there ! 20 For there the Rose, o'er crag or vale, Sultana of the Nightingale,^ i. Fair clime ! where ceaseless summer smiles Benignant o'er those blessed isla, Which seen from far Colonna's height^ Make glad the heart that hails the sight. And lend to loneliness delight. There shine the bright abodes ye seek, Like dimples upon Ocean's cheek, So smiling round the waters lave These Edens of the Eastern wave. Or if, at times, the traftsient breeze Break the smooth crystal of the seas. Or brush one blossom from the trees, Hozv grateful is each ge?itle air That wakes and wafts the fragrance there. — MS.' the fragrance there. — Second Edition. ^ I. The attachment of the nightingale to the rose is a well-known Persian fable. If I mistake not, the " Bulbul of a thousand tales" is one of his appellations. [Thus Mesihi, as translated by Sir William Jones — '*Come, charming maid ! and hear thy poet sing, Thyself the rose and he the bird of spring : Love bids him sing, and Love will be obey'd. Be gay : too soon the flowers of spring will fade."

" The full style and title of the Persian nightingale {Pycnonotus