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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/435

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THE DESTRUCTION OF JERUSALEM BY TITUS.

For he who soars alone above,
And leaves my soul unworthy saving.


III.

She's gone, who shared my diadem;
She sunk, with her my joys entombing;
I swept that flower from Judah's stem,
Whose leaves for me alone were blooming;
And mine's the guilt, and mine the hell,
This bosom's desolation dooming;
And I have earned those tortures well,[1]
Which unconsumed are still consuming!

Jan. 15, 1815.


ON THE DAY OF THE DESTRUCTION OF JERUSALEM BY TITUS.

I.

From the last hill that looks on thy once holy dome,[2]
I beheld thee, oh Sion! when rendered to Rome:[3]
'Twas thy last sun went down, and the flames of thy fall
Flashed back on the last glance I gave to thy wall.


II.

I looked for thy temple—I looked for my home,
And forgot for a moment my bondage to come;[4]
I beheld but the death-fire that fed on thy fane,
And the fast-fettered hands that made vengeance in vain.


  1. Oh I have earned ——.—[MS.]
  2. —— that looks o'er thy once holy dome.—[MS.]
  3. —— o'er thy once holy wall
    I beheld thee O Sion the day of thy fall.—[MS. erased.]

  4. And forgot in their ruin ——.—[MS. erased.]