Open main menu

Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/71

This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
41
AND THOU ART DEAD, AS YOUNG AND FAIR.

AND THOU ART DEAD, AS YOUNG AND FAIR.[1]

Heu, quanto minus est cum reliquis versari quam tui merminisse!"[2]

1.

And thou art dead, as young and fair
As aught of mortal birth;
And form so soft, and charms so rare,
Too soon returned to Earth![3]
Though Earth received them in her bed,
And o'er the spot the crowd may tread[4]
In carelessness or mirth,
There is an eye which could not brook
A moment on that grave to look.


  1. Stanzas.—[Editions 1812-1831.]
  2. ["The Lovers' Walk is terminated with an ornamental urn, inscribed to Miss Dolman, a beautiful and amiable relation of Mr. Shenstone's, who died of the small-pox, about twenty-one years of age, in the following words on one side:—

    "'Peramabili consobrinæ
    M.D.'

    On the other side—

    "'Ah! Maria!
    pvellarvm elegantissima!
    ah Flore venvstatis abrepta,
    vale!
    hev qvanto minvs est
    cvm reliqvis versari
    qvam tui
    meminisse.'"

    (From a Description of the Leasowes, by A. Dodsley; Poetical Works of William Shenstone [1798], p. xxix.)]

  3. Are mingled with the Earth.—[MS.]
    Were never meant for Earth.—[MS. erased.]
  4. Unhonoured with the vulgar dread.—[MS. erased.]