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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/40

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JEUX D'ESPRIT AND MINOR POEMS, 1798-1824.

Then who shall say so good a fellow
Was only "leather and prunella?"
For character—he did not lack it;
And if he did, 'twere shame to "Black-it."

Malta, May 16, 1811.
[First published, Lord Byron's Works, 1832, ix. 10.]


ON MOORE'S LAST OPERATIC FARCE, OR FARCICAL OPERA.[1]

Good plays are scarce,
So Moore writes farce;
The poet's fame grows brittle[2]
We knew before
That Little's Moore,
But now 't is Moore that's little.

September 14, 1811.
[First published, Letters and Journals, 1830, i. 295 (note).]


[R. C. DALLAS.][3]

Yes! wisdom shines in all his mien,
Which would so captivate, I ween,

Wisdom's own goddess Pallas;
  1. ["On a leaf of one of his paper books I find an epigram, written at this time, which, though not perhaps particularly good, I consider myself bound to insert."—Moore, Life, p. 137, note 1. The reference is to Moore's M.P.; or, The Blue Stocking, which was played for the first time at the Lyceum Theatre, September 9, 1811. For Moore's nom de plume, "The late Thomas Little, Esq.," compare Praed's The Belle of the Ball-Room

    "If those bright lips had quoted Locke,
    I might have thought they murmured Little."]

  2. Is fame like his so brittle?—[MS.]
  3. ["A person observing that Mr. Dallas looked very wise on a certain occasion, his Lordship is said to have broke out into the following impromptu."—Life, Writings, Times, and Opinions of Lord Byron, 1825, ii. 191.]