Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 101 Part 2.djvu/521

This page needs to be proofread.
101 STAT. 1329-178
101 STAT. 1329-178
PUBLIC LAW 100-000—MMMM. DD, 1987

PUBLIC LAW 100-202—DEC. 22, 1987

101 STAT. 1329-178

(4) the Congress further recognizes that the United Nations has consistently failed to address the violation of fundamental human rights and freedoms in Cuba, (b) It is the sense of Congress that— (1) the United Nations and the United Nations Human Rights Commission have acted selectively and inconsistently in addressing violations of basic human rights in various countries; (2) the United Nations General Assembly and the United Nations Human Rights Commission have failed to responsibly address the deplorable human rights situation in Cuba despite overwhelming evidence of the continuing disregard and systematic abuse of the most basic human rights by the Government of Cuba; (3) the President, the Secretary of State, and the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations are to be commended for their efforts to place Cuba on the human rights agenda of the United Nations and are strongly encouraged to continue in their efforts to bring this issue to the attention of the United Nations; (4) the following countries are to be commended for their courageous vote in favor of considering human rights violations in Cuba, particularly in light of the thinly veiled threats of the Cuban delegation: Austria, Australia, Belgium, Costa Rica, France, Gambia, the Federal Republic of Germany, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Lesotho, Liberia, Norway, the Philippines, Somalia, Togo, and the United Kingdom; (5) member states of the United Nations Human Rights Commission interested in democracy in the region, particularly Mexico, Spain, Peru, Venezuela, Argentina, and Colombia, should support the United States resolution on Cuban human rights at the next session of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, and that the United States should take into account this vote in determining United States bilateral and other assistance to all countries which are members of the Commission; (6) the United States should continue to emphasize how other countries vote on fundamental issues such as human rights when determining financial support for the United Nations, including the contribution to the Human Rights Commission; and (7) the United Nations Human Rights Commission, which will hold its forty-fourth session in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1988 should include among the highest priorities of its human rights agenda consideration of human rights violations in Cuba. OPPOSITION TO ASSISTANCE TO TERRORIST COUNTRIES BY INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS SEC. 575. (a) INSTRUCTIONS FOR UNITED STATES EXECUTIVE DIREC-

TORS.—The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United Loans. States Executive Director of each international financial institution to vote against any loan or other use of the funds of the respective institution to or for a country for which the Secretary of State has made a determination under section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979.