Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 102 Part 3.djvu/215

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102 STAT. 2268-31
102 STAT. 2268-31
PUBLIC LAW 100-000—MMMM. DD, 1988

PUBLIC LAW 100-461—OCT. 1, 1988

102 STAT. 2268-31

Fund", "Foreign Military Credit Sales", "Military Assistance", "International Military Education and Training", the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (Public Law 480), development assistance programs, or trade promotion programs should fully cooperate with the international refugee assistance organizations, the United States, and other governments in facilitating lasting solutions to refugee situations. Further, where resettlement to other countries is the appropriate solution, such resettlement should be expedited in cooperation with the country of asylum without respect to race, sex, religion, or national origin. IMMUNIZATIONS FOR CHILDREN

SEC. 541. (a) The Congress finds that— (1) the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) reports that four million children die annually because they have not been immunized against the six major childhood diseases: polio, measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis; (2) at present less than 20 percent of children in the developing world are fully immunized against these diseases; (3) each year more than five million additional children are permanently disabled and suffer diminished capacities to contribute to the economic, social and political development of their countries because they have not been immunized; (4) ten million additional childhood deaths from immunizable and potentially immunizable diseases could be averted annually by the development of techniques in biotechnology for new and cost-effective vaccines; (5) the World Health Assembly, the Executive Board of the United Nations Children's Fund, and the United Nations General Assembly are calling upon the nations of the world to commit the resources necessary to meet the challenge of universal access to childhood immunization by 1990; (6) the United States, through the Centers for Disease Control and the Agency for International Development, joined in a global effort by providing political and technical leadership that made possible the eradication of smallpox during the 1970's; (7) the development of national immunization systems that can both be sustained and also serve as a model for a wide range of primary health care actions is a desired outcome of our foreign assistance policy; (8) the United States Centers for Disease Control headquartered in Atlanta is uniquely qualified to provide technical assistance for a worldwide immunization and eradication effort and is universally respected; (9) at the 1984 Bellagio Conference it was determined that the goal of universal childhood immunization by 1990 is indeed achievable; (10) the Congress, through authorizations and appropriations for international health research and primary health care activities and the establishment of the Child Survival Fund, has played a vital role in providing for the well-being of the world's children; (11) the Congress has expressed its expectation that the Agency for International Development will set as a goal the immunization by 1990 of at least 80 percent of all the children in those countries in which the Agency has a program; and