Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 106 Part 6.djvu/629

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CONCURRENT RESOLUTIONS—MAY 21, 1992 106 STAT. 5187 the Senate. Such committee reports should consider the following matters— (1) an identification of the objectives intended for the program and the problem it was intended to address; (2) an identification of any trends, developments, and emerging conditions which are likely to affect the future nature and extent of the problems or needs which the program is intended to address; (3) an identification of any other program having potentially conflicting or duplicative objectives; ^ (4) a statement of the number and types of beneficiaries or persons served by the program; (5) an assessment of the effectiveness of the program and the degrees to which the original objectives of the program or CToup of programs have been achieved; (6) an assessment of the cost effectiveness of the program; and (7) an assessment of the relative merits of alternative methods which could be considered to achieve the purposes of the program. SEC. 16. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING INCREASING PRODUCTIVrrY. (a) FINDING.— The Senate finds that— (1) failure to meet the challenge of international economic competitiveness would seriously ieopardize our national security, standard of living, and quality of life in the coming decades; and (2) increased productivity is the key to meeting the challenge and regaining the competitive edge the United States economy enjoyed in the past. (b) SENSE OF THE SENATE.—It is the sense of the Senate that funds should be allocated to allow this Nation to commit to an increase in productivity and international competitiveness through a program of long-term strategic investment in— (1) the development of its human resources; - (2) the physical infrastructure that supports economic activity; (3) the development and commerciaUzation of technology; and (4) productive plants and equipment. SEC. 17. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON WIC. (a) FINDINGS.— The Congress finds that— (1) the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) has been invaluable to millions of needy pregnant and nursing women, infants and children at nutritional risk for nearly 20 years; (2) President Bush has commendably recommended an increase in the WIC program for fiscal year 1993, continuing the strong bipartisan support for expanding the program to serve more of those eligible; (3) the chairmen of five major American corporations testified last year on WIC, declsiring that an increased investment in WIC is essential to the Nation's future economic growth and that "WIC can make an important contribution to ensuring that... we have the productive workforce we need"; (4) the CEO's called WIC "the health-care equivalent of a triple-A rated investment... one of the most reliable ways