Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 106 Part 6.djvu/677

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PROCLAMATION 6412—MAR. 17, 1992 106 STAT. 5235 tion and the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to sections 501, 502(c), 504(a)(1), and 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that: (1) In order to provide that Malaysia should no longer be treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to HTS heading 4007.00.00 for purposes of the GSP, the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for HTS heading 4007.00.00 is modified: (i) by deleting the symbol "A" in parentheses, and (ii) by inserting the symbol "A*" in lieu thereof. (2) In order to provide that Malaysia should no longer be treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to HTS heading 4007.00.00 for purposes of the GSP, general note 3(c)(ii)(D) to the HTS is modified by adding, in numerical sequence, "4007.00.00 Malaysia". (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders inconsistent with the provisions of this proclamation are hereby superseded to the extent of such inconsistency. (4) The modifications to the HTS made by paragraphs (1) and (2) of this proclamation shall be effective with respect to articles both: (i) imported on or after January 1, 1976, and (ii) entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 15 days after the date of publication of this proclamation in the Federal Register. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixteenth. GEORGE BUSH Proclamation 6412 of March 17, 1992 National Women in Agriculture Day, 1992 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As we Americans observe Women's History Month this March, we remember in a special way women who were pioneers in their respective fields—including women who were the first to pursue jobs and degrees traditionally held by men. Women have always played leading roles in American agriculture, however, and today Uiey remain full working partners on our Nation's farms. On this occasion, we gratefully recognize their contributions and achievements. In every generation, in times of adversity as well as in times of plenty, women have demonstrated the hardy spirit and the finely honed skills necessary to ensure the survival of the American farm. On the frontier, women helped to raise crops and care for livestock while meeting the numerous demands of home and family. During periods of conflict in our Nation's history—and, in particular, during the long and difficult years of the Second World War—women played critical roles in the management and operation of our farms and ranches. Today new challenges confront American farm women as they strive to apply innovative agricultural methods and technology while meet-