Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 107 Part 3.djvu/381

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PUBLIC LAW 103-199—DEC. 17, 1993 107 STAT. 2319 between the United States and Russia. The Congress affirms its support for the principles contained in the Vancouver Declaration. (2) The Vancouver Declaration underscored that— (A) a dynamic and effective partnership between the United States and Russia is vital to the success of Russia's historic transformation; (B) the rapid integration of Russia into the community of democratic nations and the world economy is important to the national interest of the United States; and (C) cooperation between the United States and Russia is essential to the peaceful resolution of international conflicts and the prcimotion of democratic values, the protection of hirnian rights, and the solution of global problems such as environmental pollution, terrorism, and narcotics trafficking. (3) The Congress enacted the FREEDOM Support Act (Public Law 102-511), as well as other legislation such as the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991 (title II of Public Law 102-228) and the Former Soviet Union Demilitarization Act of 1992 (title XEV of Public Law 102-484), to help meet the historic opportvuiities and challenges presented by the transformation that has taken place, and is continuing to take place, in what once was the Soviet Union. (4) The process of reform in Russia, Ukraine, and the other independent states of the former Soviet Union is ongoing. The holding of a rsferendum in Russia on April 25, 1993, that was free and fair, and that reflected the support of the Russian people for the process of continued and strengthened democratic and economic reform, represents an important and encouraging hallmark in this ongoing process. (5) There remain in force many United States laws that are relics of the Cold War, and repeals or revisions of these provisions can play an important role in efforts to foster and strengthen the bonds of trust and friendship, as well as mutually beneficial trade and economic relations, between the United States and Russia, the United States and Ukraine, and the United States and the other independent states of the former Soviet Union. SEC. 103. STATUTORY PROVISIONS THAT HAVE BEEN APPLICABLE TO 22 USC 5801 THE SOVIET UNION. note. (a) IN GENERAL.—There are numerous statutory provisions that were enacted in the context of United States relations with a country, the Soviet Union, that are fundamentally different from the relations that now exist between the United States and Russia, between the United States and Ukraine, and between the United States and the other independent states of the former Soviet Union. (b) EXTENT OF SUCH PROVISIONS. —Many of the provisions referred to in subsection (a) imposed limitations specifically with respect to the Soviet Union, and its constituent republics, or utilized language that reflected the tension that existed between the United States and the Soviet Union at the time of their enactment. Other such provisions did not refer specifically to the Soviet Union, but nonemeless were directed (or may be construed as having been directed) against the Soviet Union on the basis of the relations