Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 107 Part 3.djvu/808

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107 STAT. 2746 PROCLAMATION 6612—OCT. 15, 1993 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety- three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighteenth. WILLIAM J. CLINTON Proclamation 6612 of October 15, 1993 White Cane Safety Day, 1993 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation . . To thousands of visually impaired Americans the white cane means freedom—freedom to move safely and independently through their daily lives, participating fully in the activities of their homes, places of employment, and communities. White Cane Safety Day not only celebrates the accomplishments of the visually impaired, but also recognizes our Nation's commitment to remove any physical or attitudinal barriers that Americans with disabilities may still face. This commitment underscores our continuing efforts to implement fully the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in such areas as employment, public accommodations, telecommunications, and transportation. In tribute to the white cane and all that it symbolizes for our society, the Congress, by Joint Resolution approved in 1964, has designated October 15 of each year as "White Cane Safety Day." NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 1993, as White Cane Safety Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereimto set my hand this fifteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety- three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighteenth. WILLIAM J. CLINTON Proclamation 6613 of October 16, 1993 World Food Day, 1993 and 1994 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Arising from poverty, homelessness, civil strife or famine, hunger burdens the lives of nearly 800 million people throughout the world. Women and children suffer the most. Studies suggest that in developing countries, some 36 percent of children under 6 years of age are moderately or severely undemoiuished. ?\H