Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 60 Part 1.djvu/723

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PUBLIC LAWS-CH. 672-JULY 26, 1946 lawbooks, other books of reference, and periodicals; library mem- bership fees or dues in organizations which issue publications to members only or to members at a lower price than to others, payment for which may be made in advance; and purchase (not to exceed two), operation, maintenance, and repair of passenger automobiles; $70,000: Transfer of fnds. Provided,That the Administrator may transfer to this appropriation from appropriations of the constituent organizations of the Federal Security Agency such sums as may be necessary to finance the purchase of duplicating materials required in performance of duplicating work for such constituent organizations, unused portions of which sums may, at any time, be retransferred by the Administrator to the original appropriations. Traveling expenses, Federal Security Agency: For traveling expenses (not appropriated for elsewhere) for the Federal Security Agency and all bureaus, boards, and constituent organizations thereof, including expenses, when specifically authorized by the Federal Secu- rity Administrator, of attendance at meetings concerned with the work of the Federal Security Agency (not to exceed $1,500 for the Office of the Administrator); and reimbursement, at not to exceed 5 cents per mile, for travel performed by employees of the Federal Security Agency in privately owned automobiles within the limits Deposit of rerim of their official stations; $2,555,100: Provided, That all receipts from non-Federal agencies representing reimbursement for subsistence and other expenses of travel of employees of the Office of Education per- forming advisory functions to said agencies shall be deposited in the Treasury of the United States to the credit of this appropriation. Printing and binding, Federal Security Agency: For printing and binding (not appropriated for elsewhere) for the Federal Security Agency and all bureaus, boards, and constituent organizations thereof, including the purchase of reprints of scientific and technical articles published in periodicals and journals, $950,000. Penalty mail costs: For deposit in the general fund of the Treasury for cost of penalty mail of the Federal Security Agency as required 58 s uat. 394. bv section 2 of the Act of June 28, 1944 (Public Law 364), $400,000. 39 U. S. C., Supp. . v. 321 d. Civilian war benefits: For all expenses necessary, including personal services in the District of Columbia and elsewhere and travel, to enable the Federal Security Administrator, in order to continue during the fiscal year 1947 the Civilian War Benefits program heretofore financed from the Emergencv Fund for the President, to provide medical and hospital care (including prosthetic appliances and medical examina- 41 .s.C . a5. tions) by contract without regard to section 3709. Revised Statutes, Po.809. and money payments, to (a) civilians within the United States who have been injured as a result of enemy attack or of action to meet such attack or the danger thereof, or who have been injured while in the performance of their official duties as civilian defense workers, (b) civilians disabled as a result of illness, injury, or disease which occurred during detention by the enemy, and (c) the dependents within the United States of individuals injured or killed under circumstances described in clause (a) or (b) or reported as missing as a result of enemy action, $158,000. Civilian war assistance: For all expenses necessary, including per- sonal services in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, to enable the Federal Security Administrator, in order to continue during the fiscal year 1947 the Civilian War Assistance program heretofore financed from the Emergency Fund for the President, to provide .s . c(a) temporary aid (including medical care by contract, transporta- P41t, .89. tion and other goods and services without regard to section 3709, Revised Statutes, and money payments) to citizens of the United States or their children under eighteen years of age who have been 696 [60 STAT.