Parliament Act, 1911

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Parliament Act, 1911  (1911) 
by the Parliament of the United Kingdom

Collective Citation: Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949

The Parliament Acts are two Acts of Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1911 and 1949 respectively. They form part of the Constitution of the United Kingdom.

The first Act, the Parliament Act 1911, limited the powers of the House of Lords to block House of Commons legislation, asserting the supremacy of the Commons. It also altered the maximum time between general elections to be five instead of seven years (amending the Septennial Act). The Parliament Act 1911 was amended by the second Act, the Parliament Act 1949, which reduced the power of the Lords further by cutting the time they could delay bills from two years to one.

The version here is the original Parliament Act 1911.

Parliament Act, 1911.

[1 & 2 Geo. 5. Ch. 13.]



A.D. 1911. 

ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS.


Section.
1. Powers of House of Lords as to Money Bills.
2. Restriction of the powers of the House of Lords as to Bills other than Money Bills.
3. Certificate of Speaker.
4. Enacting words.
5. Provisional Order Bills excluded.
6. Saving for existing rights and privileges of the House of Commons.
7. Duration of Parliament.
8. Short title.

UK Parliamentary White Paper Cmd 1704 (page 1 crop).jpg

CHAPTER 13.

A.D. 1911.  An Act to make provision with respect to the powers of the House of Lords in relation to those of the House of Commons, and to limit the duration of Parliament.[18th August 1911.]

WHEREAS it is expedient that provision should be made for regulating the relations between the two Houses of Parliament:

And whereas it is intended to substitute for the House of Lords as it at present exists a Second Chamber constituted on a popular instead of hereditary basis, but such substitution cannot be immediately brought into operation:

And whereas provision will require hereafter to be made by Parliament in a measure effecting such substitution for limiting and defining the powers of the now Second Chamber, but it is expedient to make such provision as in this Act appears for restricting the existing powers of the House of Lords:

Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

Powers of House of Lords as to Money Bills.  1.—(1) If a Money Bill, having been passed by the House of Commons, and sent up to the House of Lords at least one month before the end of the session, is not passed by the House of Lords without amendment within one month after it is so sent up to that House, the Bill shall, unless the House of Commons direct to the contrary, be presented to His Majesty and become an Act of Parliament on the Royal Assent being signified, notwithstanding that the House of Lords have not consented to the Bill.

(2) A Money Bill means a Public Bill which in the opinion of the Speaker of the House of Commons contains only provisions dealing with all or any of the following subjects, namely, the imposition, repeal, remission, alteration, or regulation of taxation; the imposition for the payment of debt or other financial purposes of charges on the Consolidated Fund, or on money provided by Parliament, or the variation or repeal of any such charges; supply; the appropriation, receipt, custody, issue or audit of accounts of public money; the raising or guarantee of any loan or the repayment thereof; or subordinate matters incidental to those subjects or any of them. In this subsection the expressions “taxation,” “public money,” and “loan” respectively do not include any taxation, money, or loan raised by local authorities or bodies for local purposes.

(3) There shall be endorsed on every Money Bill when it is sent up to the House of Lords and when it is presented to His Majesty for assent the certificate of the Speaker of the House of Commons signed by him that it is a Money Bill. Before giving his certificate, the Speaker shall consult, if practicable, two members to be appointed from the Chairman’s Panel at the beginning of each Session by the Committee of Selection.

Restriction of the powers of the House of Lords as to Bills other than Money Bills.  2.—(1) If any Public Bill (other than a Money Bill or a of Bill containing any provision to extend the maximum duration of Parliament beyond five years) is passed by the House of Commons in three successive sessions (whether of the same Parliament or not), and, having been sent up to the House of Lords at least one month before the end of the session, is rejected by the House of Lords in each of those sessions, that Bill shall, on its rejection for the third time by the House of Lords, unless the House of Commons direct direct to the contrary, to His Majesty and become an Act of Parliament on the Royal Assent being signified thereto, notwithstanding that the House of Lords have not consented to the Bill: Provided that this provision shall not take effect unless two years have elapsed between tho date of the second reading in the first of those sessions of the Bill in the House of Commons and the date on which it passes the House of Commons in tho third of those sessions.

(2) When a Bill is presented to His Majesty for assent in pursuance of the provisions of this section, there shall be endorsed on the Bill the certificate of the Speaker of the House of Commons signed by him that the provisions of this section have been duly complied with.

(3) A Bill shall be deemed to be rejected by the House of Lords if it is not passed by the House of Lords either without amendment or with such amendments only as may be agreed to by both Houses.

(4) A Bill shall be deemed to be the same Bill as a former Bill sent up to the House of Lords in the preceding session if, when it is sent up to the House of Lords, it is identical with the former Bill or contains only such alterations as are certified by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be necessary owing to the time which has elapsed since the date of the former Bill, or to represent any amendments which have been made by the House of Lords in the former Bill in the preceding session, and any amendments which are certified by the Speaker to have been made by tho House of Lords in the third session and agreed to by the House of Commons shall be inserted in the Bill as presented for Royal Assent in pursuance of this section:

Provided that the House of Commons may, if they think fit, on tho passage of such a Bill through the House in the second or third session, suggest any further amendments without inserting the amendments in the Bill, and any such suggested amendments shall be considered by the House of Lords, and, if agreed to by that House, shall be treated as amendments made by the House of Lords and agreed to by the House of Commons; but the exercise of this power by the House of Commons shall not affect the operation of this section in the event of the Bill being rejected by the House of Lords.

Powers of House of Lords as to Money Bills.  3. Any certificate of the Speaker of the House of Commons Certificate given under this Act shall be conclusive for all purposes, and of Speaker. shall not he questioned in any court of law.

Powers of House of Lords as to Money Bills.  4.—(1) In every Bill presented to His Majesty under the Enacting preceding provisions of this Act, the words of enactment shall words. be as follows, that is to say:—

“Be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Act, 1911, and by authority of the same, as follows.”

(2) Any alteration of a Bill necessary to give effect to this section shall not be deemed to be an amendment of the Bill.

Provisional Order Bills excluded.  5. In this Act the expression “Public Bill” does not include any Bill for confirming a Provisional Order.

Saving for existing rights and privileges of the House of Commons.  6. Nothing in this Act shall diminish or qualify the existing rights and privileges of the House of Commons.


Duration of Parliament.
1 Geo. 1, stat. 2, c. 38.
 
7. Five years shall be substituted for seven years as the time fixed for the maximum duration of Parliament under the Septennial Act, 1715.


Short title.  8. This Act may be cited as the Parliament Act, 1911.

This work is in the public domain worldwide because it is one of the following types of legislation in the United Kingdom, and received Royal Assent or the approval of HM in Council (as applicable) before 1972:

See section 164 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (as amended).