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Proclamation 4496

By the President of the United States
of America
A Proclamation

We live in a world where all of us must depend on each other--a world divided by nationality and philosophy, but drawn together by common problems and common hopes. We share with all people a concern about unemployment, inequality, poverty, inflation, and the danger of war. And we share with all people the hope of a life free of hunger, disease, and repression, and a determination to overcome international differences with mutual trust, respect, and cooperation.

Our desire for justice, stability, and peace finds practical expression in world trade. Trade generates forces of friendship and understanding, which in turn bring us closer to the kind of world we want.

The United States is the unsurpassed leader in international commerce. Because our total trade is greater than that of any other nation, we can, by increasing our trade activities, make an enormous contribution to the health of the international economy, to the job market at home and abroad, to progressive relationships between rich and poor nations and, finally, to the cause of peace on our globe.

Now, THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning May 22, 1977, as World Trade Week. I urge business, labor, agricultural, educational, professional and civic groups, the communications media, and all concerned Americans, to observe World Trade Week with meetings, discussions, exhibits, ceremonies, and other appropriate activities that promote continuing awareness of the importance of world trade to our Nation and to our relations with other nations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and first.

JIMMY CARTER

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:11 p.m., April 8, 1977]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).