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By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Motherhood is a lifelong commitment.
It is a promise to share in fulfilling all the unique potential of a helpless newborn child, and to shape that person into an independent, responsible adult. For some, motherhood means guiding bright minds, strong bodies, and exquisite talents-maintaining a delicate balance between humanity and the special gifts of God. For others, motherhood means helping a weak body or an unawakened mind overcome burdens that may often seem too great to bear. For both, motherhood brings the privilege of seeing the tired world through fresh eyes and the satisfaction of knowing that one has met another's needs in a way no other could.

To the mothers of America, in recognition of their achievements in the art of raising a new generation of Americans and as an acknowledgment of all they have done to shape our national character, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770; 36 U.S.C. 141), has set aside the second Sunday in May of each year as a day of special tribute.

Now, THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1978, be observed throughout our nation as Mother's Day. I ask all Americans to take this opportunity to express their personal gratitude to their own mothers and to thank all those women whose tireless devotion to their families has so enriched our nation.

I ask all public officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings and urge all Americans to display our flag at their homes or other suitable places on that day as a public expression of our love for the mothers of our country.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and second.

JIMMY CARTER
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:17 p.m., May 11, 1978]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).