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By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

In May 1982, a six-month International Energy Exposition will open in Knoxville, Tennessee, inviting the nations of the world to think anew of man's relationship with the pervasive force of energy which fundamentally shapes the choices people have as to the endurance and enjoyment of life itself. This exposition, whose theme is "Energy Turns the World," will provide a splendid setting in which to explore new technologies to conserve energy, to harness the long-lasting and most renewable sources, and to carry on the search for new sources of energy.

Because of the opportunities which the Exposition offers for a deeper understanding of energy issues and for the stimulation of trade and cultural exchange, this Administration is moving to extend the fullest possible recognition to this event in accordance with Public Law 91 -269. On April 26, 1977, I advised the Secretaries of State and Commerce that the Exposition warrants Federal recognition as provided by statute. On April 27, 1977, upon request of the United States, the Bureau of International Expositions officially registered the event as a Special Category exposition by unanimous vote.

Also, in accordance with law, I shall appoint a United States Commissioner General to exercise the responsibility of the United States Government for fulfillment of the Convention of November 22, 1928, Relating' to International Expositions, as modified, and to invite the several States of the Union to participate.

Now, THEREFORE, I, Jimmy CARTER, President of the United States of America, in further recognition of this International Energy Exposition, do hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to invite, on my behalf, such foreign countries as he may consider appropriate to participate in this event.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of December, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and third.

JIMMY CARTER

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 9:58 a.m., December 8, 1978]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).