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By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Fifty years ago, on July 21, 1930, President Herbert Hoover established the Veterans Administration, fulfilling the words of Abraham Lincoln that our great Nation would "care for him who had borne the battle, and for his widow and orphan."

The world has seen much turbulence and suffering since that day, and American families have all touched in some sense the tragedy of war. Throughout this period, the Veterans Administration has set a standard of care and compassion.

On this 50th anniversary of the Veterans Administration, Americans take pride in having led the world in healing the physical and social wounds of war. Our system of assistance and care for veterans is the most comprehensive in the world. In medicine, the Veterans Administration has been a leader in innovation, research, and the quality of care. Its staff includes Nobel Prize winners and other men and women of international renown. Millions of Americans have been helped by Veterans Administration benefits and services, and protected by Veterans Administration life insurance. Veterans loan guarantees have made home ownership possible for tens of thousands of families, and GI Bill education has transformed the social fabric of America. These efforts express our appreciation and commitment to those who have sacrificed for our country and to the families of those who gave their lives in its service.

Now, THEREFORE, I, JIMMY CARTER, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim July 21, 1980, as Veterans Administration 50th Anniversary Day, and call upon State and local officials and all Americans to observe this day with appropriate activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred eighty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourth.

JIMMY CARTER
[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 3:05 p.m., June 16, 1980]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).