Shah Nameh/Húsheng


It is recorded that Húsheng was the first who brought out fire from stone, and from that circumstance he founded the religion of the Fire-worshippers, calling the flame which was produced, the Light of the Divinity. The accidental discovery of this element is thus described:—

  Passing, one day, towards the mountain's side,
  Attended by his train, surprised he saw
  Something in aspect terrible--its eyes
  Fountains of blood; its dreadful mouth sent forth
  Volumes of smoke that darkened all the air.
  Fixing his gaze upon that hideous form,
  He seized a stone, and with prodigious force
  Hurling it, chanced to strike a jutting rock,
  Whence sparks arose, and presently a fire
  O'erspread the plain, in which the monster perished.
  --Thus Húsheng found the element which shed
  Light through the world. The monarch prostrate bowed,
  Praising the great Creator, for the good
  Bestowed on man, and, pious, then he said,
  "This is the Light from Heaven, sent down from God;
  If ye be wise, adore and worship it!"

It is also related that, in the evening of the day on which the luminous flash appeared to him from the stone, he lighted an immense fire, and, having made a royal entertainment, he called it the Festival of Siddeh. By him the art of the blacksmith was discovered, and he taught river and streamlet to supply the towns, and irrigate the fields for the purposes of cultivation. And he also brought into use the fur of the sable, and the squirrel, and the ermine. Before his time mankind had nothing for food but fruit, and the leaves of trees and the skins of animals for clothing. He introduced, and taught his people, the method of making bread, and the art of cookery.

  Then ate they their own bread, for it was good,
  And they were grateful to their benefactor;
  Mild laws were framed--the very land rejoiced,
  Smiling with cultivation; all the world
  Remembering Húsheng's virtues.

The period of his government is said to have lasted forty years, and he was succeeded by his son, Tahúmers.