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Sketches by Mark Twain/Answers to Correspondents

< Sketches by Mark Twain

Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/309 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/310 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/311 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/312 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/313 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/314 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/315 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/316 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/317 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/318 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/319 Page:Sketches by Mark Twain.djvu/320 ence is, and your question will be answered. But don't torture me with any more arithmetical horrors until you know I am rid of my cold. I feel the bitterest animosity towards you at this moment—bothering me in this way, when I can do nothing but sneeze and rage and snort pocket-handkerchiefs to atoms. If I had you in range of my nose, now, I would blow your brains out.