Song Bird and Flower

Song Bird and Flower  (1839) 
by William Gilmore Simms

I.


In the forest deep a flower was growing,
  In the forest deep, without a peer;
To its secret home in beauty glowing,
  Came one day a lovely song bird near:
With wild strain of love enamor'd flying,
  To the flowret's lips at last he press'd,
And, another moment, he was lying,
  Lying close, and nestling in her breast.

II.


Day by day he flew to seek the flower,
  Blooming in that forest wild and deep,
And when came at last the parting hour,—
  And he left her,—she was left to weep.
But, when later every day returning,
  Sad and sick she chided his delay,
"Wherefore, when my heart is for thee burning,
  Dost thou linger, loved one, by the way?"

III.


Gayly then, with song, the bird replying
  Vex'd the gentle spirit which adored;—
"O'er a thousand forests I've been flying,
  To a thousand flowers that call me lord!"
Like the pliant grass in heavy showers,
  Sank the flowret then with many a tear,—
"Thou," she cried, "hast sought a thousand flowers,
  I were most happy with one song bird here."