The Achievements of Luther Trant

The Achievements of Luther Trant  (1910) 
by Edwin Balmer and William MacHarg

A collection of short mystery stories following Luther Trant, a skilled psychologist and private detective

Image of plain book cover with text The Achievements of Luther Trant, MacHarg-Balmer

THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF
LUTHER TRANT

Luther Trant 1.jpg

"I do not know him," Axton's eyes glanced furtively about. "I have never seen him before. This is not Lawler." See page 316

THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF
LUTHER TRANT


BY
EDWIN BALMERWILLIAM MacHARG


ILLUSTRATED BY
William Oberhardt


Small, Maynard and Company logo.jpg


BOSTON
SMALL, MAYNARD AND COMPANY

PUBLISHERS

Copyright, 1909–1910
By Benj. B. Hampton

Copyright, 1910
By Small, Maynard & Company
(Incorporated)



Entered at Stationers' Hall

CONTENTS

PAGE
I The Man in the Room 1
II The Fast Watch 39
III The Red Dress 74
IV The Private Bank Puzzle 113
V The Man Higher Up 148
VI The Chalchihuitl Stone 186
VII The Empty Cartridges 231
VIII The Axton Letters 280
IX The Eleventh Hour 324

ILLUSTRATIONS

FACING PAGE
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Frontispiece
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44
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102
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130
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170
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222
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258
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362

FOREWORD

Except for its characters and plot, this book is not a work of the imagination.

The methods which the fictitious Trant—one time assistant in a psychological laboratory, now turned detective—here uses to solve the mysteries which present themselves to him, are real methods; the tests he employs are real tests.

Though little known to the general public, they are precisely such as are being used daily in the psychological laboratories of the great universities—both in America and Europe—by means of which modern men of science are at last disclosing and defining the workings of that oldest of world-mysteries—the human mind.

The facts which Trant uses are in no way debatable facts; nor do they rest on evidence of untrained, imaginative observers. Innumerable experiments in our university laboratories have established beyond question that, for instance, the resistance of the human body to a weak electric current varies when the subject is frightened or undergoes emotion; and the consequent variation in the strength of the current, depending directly upon the amount of emotional disturbance, can be registered by the galvanometer for all to see. The hand resting upon an automatograph will travel toward an object which excites emotion, however capable its possessor may be of restraining all other evidence of what he feels.

If these facts are not used as yet except in the academic experiments of the psychological laboratories and the very real and useful purpose to which they have been put in the diagnosis of insanities, it is not because they are incapable of wider use. The results of the "new psychology" are coming every day closer to an exact interpretation. The hour is close at hand when they will be used not merely in the determination of guilt and innocence, but to establish in the courts the credibility of witnesses and the impartiality of jurors, and by employers to ascertain the fitness and particular abilities of their employees.

Luther Trant, therefore, nowhere in this book needs to invent or devise an experiment or an instrument for any of the results he here attains; he has merely to adapt a part of the tried and accepted experiments of modern, scientific psychology. He himself is a character of fiction; but his methods are matters of fact.

The Authors.

THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF
LUTHER TRANT

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1926.


The author died in 1959, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.