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Hood, Thomas, an English poet, was born at London, May 23, 1798. His autobiography, Literary Reminiscences, tells us that until 13 years of age he was educated by two maiden ladies, and afterward all he knew he acquired without tutors. Showing some literary genius, he was made assistant-editor of the London Magazine, and this association developed his talents. His first poems attracted no attention, and it was not until the appearance of Eugene Aram that full recognition was accorded him. His writings were exceedingly numerous, so much so that many are without merit; but his lyrics, as The Song of the Shirt, the Bridge of Sighs and the Ode to Melancholy will never die. He was remarkable for his powers of punning, a power that in his hands was put to many new uses. He died at Devonshire Lodge, London on May 3, 1845.