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Rover Boys Down East.djvu

THE ROVER BOYS

DOWN EAST


OR


THE STRUGGLE FOR THE STANHOPE
FORTUNE


BY

ARTHUR M. WINFIELD

(Edward Stratemeyer)


ILLUSTRATED


NEW YORK

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS

Made in the United States of America

Rover Boys Down East p004.jpg

"WELL, NOW THE TENT IS FIXED, WE'LL HAVE SUPPER," SAID DICK.

The Rover Boys Down East.
Frontispiece—(Page 130.)
 


INTRODUCTION


My Dear Boys: This is a complete story in itself, but forms the fifteenth volume of the "Rover Boys Series for Young Americans."

Twelve years ago the line was started with the publication of the first three stories, "The Rover Boys at School," "On the Ocean," and "In the Jungle." I earnestly hoped that the young people would like the tales, but never did I anticipate the tremendously enthusiastic welcome which was given to the volumes from the start, nor the steady sale, ever increasing, which has been accorded the series up to the present time. The publication of the first three books immediately called for a fourth, "The Rover Boys Out West," and then followed yearly "On the Great Lakes," "In Camp," "On Land and Sea," "On the River," "On the Plains," "In Southern Waters," "On the Farm," "On Treasure Isle," and then "At College," where we last left our heroes.

Dick, Tom and Sam are older than when we first made their acquaintance and told how they went to Putnam Hall. They are now college boys, attending a well-known institution of learning in the middle-west. But though older, they are as lively as ever, and Tom, at least, is just as full of fun. They have a great struggle to save the Stanhope fortune, and have to work hard to get the best of several enemies. They take a long journey Down East, and their adventures are both mysterious and exciting.

Again I take this opportunity to thank my friends, both young and old, for all the nice things they have said about my books. I am more than sorry that I cannot answer all the letters that pour in upon me from everywhere praising the stories. I earnestly hope the present volume will please all my readers and do them some good.

Affectionately and sincerely yours,

Edward Stratemeyer


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924.


The author died in 1930, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.