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Rover Boys on Treasure Isle.djvu

THE ROVER BOYS

ON TREASURE ISLE


OR


THE STRANGE CRUISE OF THE
STEAM YACHT


BY

ARTHUR M. WINFIELD

(Edward Stratemeyer)


ILLUSTRATED


NEW YORK

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS

Made in the United States of America

Rover Boys Treasure Isle P006.jpg

IT WAS EXCITING TO BRING THE ROWBOAT THROUGH THE PASSAGE.—Page 188.

The Rover Boys on Treasure Isle.

INTRODUCTION.


My Dear Boys: This is a complete tale in itself, but forms the thirteenth volume of the "Rover Boys Series for Young Americans."

This line of books was started some ten years ago with the publication of the first three volumes, "The Rover Boys at School," "The Rover Boys on the Ocean" and "The Rover Boys in the Jungle." At that time I thought to end the series with a fourth volume—provided the readers wanted another. But with the publication of "The Rover Boys Out West," came a cry for "more!" and so I added "On the Great Lakes," "In the Mountains," "In Camp," "On Land and Sea," "On the River," "On the Plains," "In Southern Waters" and "On the Farm," where we last left our friends.

For a number of years Tom, Dick and Sam have attended a military academy, but now their school days at Putnam Hall are at an end, and we find them getting ready to go to college. But before leaving home for the higher seat of learning they take a remarkable cruise on a steam yacht, searching for an island upon which it is said a large treasure is hidden. They are accompanied on this trip by their father and a number of friends, and have several adventures somewhat out of the ordinary, and also a good bit of fun–for there is bound to be fun when Tom Rover is around. They lose themselves and lose their yacht, and once some of them come pretty close to losing their lives, but in the end—well, the story will tell the rest.

I cannot close without again thanking my many friends for all the nice things they have said about the "Rover Boys" stories and the "Putnam Hall" stories. I trust the present volume will fulfill every fair expectation.

Affectionately and sincerely yours,

Edward Stratemeyer



This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924.


The author died in 1930, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.