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The Spirit of the Nation/The House that Paddy Built

< The Spirit of the Nation

THE HOUSE THAT PADDY BUILT.

"Take this—What's this?"

This is the House that Paddy built!—
This is the Parliament that sat in the House that Paddy built—
These are the slaves, who basely bent,
And sold to England the Parliament,
That sat in the House that Paddy built!


This is the Lord, of name accurst!—
The leader and chief—and by much the worst
Of that vile crew, who basely bent,
And sold to England, &c.


These are the bribes—in money and place,
And titles—the badges of shame and disgrace!—
That were given by that Lord of name accurst—
The leader and chief—and by much the worst
Of that vile crew, &c.


These are the tortures and murders fell,
That maddened the people and made them rebel,
And (along with the bribes in money and place,
And titles—the badges of shame and disgrace)
Played the game of that Lord, of name accurst—
The leader and chief—and, &c.


This is The Union—that Union of Woe!
Which Ireland was forced to undergo,
When her hopes were lost, and her spirit was low!
From the dire confusion, and slaughter fell
That ensued from the terrible struggle to quell
Her people, whom tortures forced to rebel,
When those tortures—with bribes in money and place,
And titles—the badges of shame and disgrace,
Played the game of that Lord, of name accurst, &c. &c.


These are the years—twice twenty and two!
That Ireland has had to endure and to rue
That Union of Name—that Union of Woe,
Which she had been forced to undergo,
When, &c.


These are the men who spoke out at last,
And said that the time for despair was past,
And that Ireland's rights were well worth one cast!
After all the years—twice twenty and two—
That, &c.


This is the struggle for justice and right—
The peaceful and good constitutional fight,
To remove from our country the Union blight!—
The struggle of those who've spoke out at last,
And said that the time of despair was past,
And that, &c.


This is the Whig Lord, who bribery tried
With the young men of Ireland, once her hope and her pride,
Who, ere they had yielded, ought surely have died!
They, who kept from the struggle for justice and right,
The peaceful and good constitutional fight,
To remove, &c.


These are the Tories, seated now in high place,
The haters of Ireland, her creed, and her race!
More bold than the Lord, who bribery tried
With the young men of Ireland, once truly her pride!
Who, ere they had yielded, ought surely have died!
They who now hold off from the struggle of right,
The peaceful and good constitutional fight,
To remove, &.c.


These—oh, these are the People—still honest and true,
Who will do once again what before they did do!
Make Peel and his fellows the rights to concede
Of a whole nation now—as before of a creed!
Shake off the vile Tories, though firm now in place,
(The haters of Ireland, her creed, and her race:)
Nor bring back the Whig Lord, who bribery tried
With the young men of Ireland, once truly her pride!
Who, ere they had yielded, ought surely have died!
They who now hold off from the struggle of right,
The peaceful and good constitutional fight,
To remove from our country the Union-blight!—
The struggle of those who've spoke out at last,
And said that the time of despair was past!
And that Ireland's rights were well worth one cast!
After all the years twice twenty and two—
That she has been doomed to endure and rue
The Union of Name—That Union of Woe!
Which England compelled her to undergo,
When her hopes were lost, and her spirit was low,
In the dire confusion and slaughter fell,
That ensued from the terrible struggle to quell
Her People, whom tortures forced to rebel!
When those tortures, with bribes in money and place,
And titles (the badges of shame and disgrace!)
Played the game of that Lord, of name accurst—
The leader and chief—and by much the worst
Even of that vile crew, who basely bent,
And sold to England her Parliament
That sat in the House that Paddy built!